It’s not the buybacks, it’s the issuance: James Saft

October 14, 2015

By James Saft

(Reuters) – Investors appear to be getting wise to the buyback illusion, looking not just at shares being extinguished but at the greater number being created.

It’s not the buybacks, it’s the issuance: James Saft

October 14, 2015

Oct 14 (Reuters) – Investors appear to be getting wise to
the buyback illusion, looking not just at shares being
extinguished but at the greater number being created.

Earnings to sing the economy’s blues: James Saft

October 13, 2015

Oct 13 (Reuters) – This U.S. earnings season the data from
the frontline is about to confirm the broader economic
narrative: things aren’t so great.

Wall St research: garbage in = garbage out: James Saft

October 7, 2015

Oct 7 (Reuters) – Regulation and legislation have failed in
the attempt to improve Wall Street company research, at least if
accuracy is the measure of success.

The Fed and its fear of financial analysis: James Saft

October 6, 2015

Oct 6 (Reuters) – The Federal Reserve isn’t just afraid of
financial instability, it appears to fear financial analysis
too.

Bad data but at least we’ve got the Fed: James Saft

October 2, 2015

Oct 2 (Reuters) – The U.S. jobs data were a bust, China
remains a threat, the Fed won’t hike until, well, don’t ask, and
bad news is good news for the stock market once again.

Carney, global warming and deep risk: James Saft

September 30, 2015

Sept 30 (Reuters) – Global warming is a source of
unprecedented deep risk for investors, with no easy answers.

Fed losing market power, taking not making prices: James Saft

September 29, 2015

NEW YORK (Reuters) – The Federal Reserve appears to be reacting to events outside its control rather than setting the agenda in financial markets.

CFOs see earnings shenanigans in 20 percent of U.S. public firms

September 24, 2015

(This story has been refiled to remove superfluous apostrophe from headline)

By James Saft

(Reuters) – If you think the fact that a U.S. company’s earnings conform to accepted standards means they are to be trusted, then allow me to introduce you to the 20 percent of chief financial officers who disagree.

CFO’s see earnings shenanigans in 20 percent of U.S. public firms: James Saft

September 23, 2015

By James Saft

(Reuters) – If you think the fact that a U.S. company’s earnings conform to accepted standards means they are to be trusted, then allow me to introduce you to the 20 percent of chief financial officers who disagree.