Negative rates and the currency wars: James Saft

July 10, 2012

By James Saft

(Reuters) – It may be better to think of the outbreak of negative interest rates as simply another weapon in an ongoing and global low-grade currency war.

Preparing for negative rates

July 5, 2012

July 5 (Reuters) – If you are not prepared for negative
interest rates, you may have left it too late.

Risks of deflation rising again: James Saft

July 5, 2012

By James Saft

(Reuters) – The Federal Reserve can and will fight the threat of falling prices.

Diamond’s parting gift: James Saft

July 3, 2012

By James Saft

(Reuters) – Bob Diamond’s gift to the UK, perhaps a parting one, is that he has managed his bank badly enough to provoke real reform but, perhaps out of luck, not so badly as to blow up the whole economy.

Saft on Wealth: The consumer finance mess

June 15, 2012

By James Saft

(Reuters) – It won’t be the American consumer who powers the economy and financial markets.

SAFT ON WEALTH: The consumer finance mess

June 14, 2012

June 14 (Reuters) – It won’t be the American consumer who
powers the economy and financial markets.

Watch German bunds for euro fate: James Saft

June 14, 2012

By James Saft

(Reuters) – The recent fall in German bunds is the most interesting development in markets in months, and may contain hints of the fate of the euro itself.

Same thing, same results in Spain: James Saft

June 12, 2012

By James Saft

(Reuters) – It is shaping up to be a vintage year for doing the same thing over and over again but expecting different results.

U.S. bonus culture limits equity returns: Jame Saft

June 7, 2012

By James Saft

(Reuters) – Quarter-by-quarter management and a compensation-driven obsession with company share prices may be impairing the long-term prospects of U.S. stocks as executives live off of their companies’ seed corn rather than disappoint a market obsessed with short-term results.

US bonus culture limits equity returns

June 7, 2012

June 7 (Reuters) – Quarter-by-quarter management and a
compensation-driven obsession with company share prices may be
impairing the long-term prospects of U.S. stocks as executives
live off of their companies’ seed corn rather than disappoint a
market obsessed with short-term results.