SNB remains neutral, surrenders: James Saft

January 15, 2015

Jan 15 (Reuters) – The Swiss National Bank’s surrender to
markets argues that next week’s Greek election and European
Central Bank meeting will bring much danger and volatility.

Diversification, a bet on human ingenuity

January 14, 2015

Jan 14 (Reuters) – To diversify investments is to bet on,
rather than against, human ingenuity.

Kaisa an object lesson in the perils of China: James Saft

January 13, 2015

Jan 13 (Reuters) – The apparent default of leading property
developer Kaisa Group Holding Ltd shows clearly just how badly
global investors are at pricing China risks.

SNB faces test amid euro woes: James Saft

January 8, 2015

By James Saft

(Reuters) – The somewhat forlorn euro has a friend in the Swiss National Bank, an ally that is unlikely to be well pleased by having to play defender.

Liquidity, now discounted, to show its value

January 7, 2015

By James Saft

(Reuters) – You don’t miss liquidity until the markets turn bad, or so investors may find out in 2015.

Euro grips the edge of the diving board: James Saft

January 6, 2015

Jan 6 (Reuters) – With Greece in the ejection seat and the
European Central Bank facing a no-win decision on bond buying,
the euro’s fall is far from over.

Drink, don’t hold, fine wine

December 31, 2014

Dec 31 (Reuters) – If you have a bottle of fine wine you are
holding as an investment, you probably ought to open it tonight.

U.S. assets enter 2015 strong; volatility may ensue

December 30, 2014

Dec 30 (Reuters) – Strong growth, cheap energy and some
forced generosity from the Federal Reserve due to falling
inflation all imply a strong first half of 2015 for U.S.
financial markets.

Wherever you go, there you are

December 18, 2014

Dec 18 (Reuters) – Here is the thing about investing:
wherever you go, there you are.

Fed playing patience as inflation lags: James Saft

December 17, 2014

Dec 17 (Reuters) – Call it patience or any of the rest of
the seven virtues if you like, but the truth is that the Fed
can’t raise interest rates because inflation won’t play along.