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Mar 15, 2012

U.S. prosecutors repeatedly hid evidence in Sen. Stevens case

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. prosecutors in the case of the late Alaska Senator Ted Stevens repeatedly hid evidence that could have exonerated him from corruption charges, according to an investigative report released on Thursday that found misconduct by Justice Department lawyers.

The prosecutors intentionally withheld and concealed information from Stevens’ defense lawyers that included witness statements, key details that could have undermined prosecutors’ star witnesses and allowed false testimony to be presented during his 2008 trial, the report said.

Mar 14, 2012

U.S. healthcare legal issues at Supreme Court

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Supreme Court has scheduled three days of historic arguments over President Barack Obama’s sweeping healthcare overhaul law. Each day features a different legal issue:

MARCH 26

At issue: Whether the legal challenge to the law’s centerpiece requirement that Americans obtain health insurance or pay a penalty must wait until after that provision, known as the “individual mandate,” has taken effect in 2014.

Mar 13, 2012

Chronology of Obama healthcare law legal battle

WASHINGTON, March 13 (Reuters) – The Supreme Court
will hear arguments on March 26-28 over the fate of President
Barack Obama’s healthcare law, a battle with legal, political
and financial implications for the U.S. healthcare
system’s biggest overhaul in nearly 50 years.

The heart of the arguments will turn on whether Congress
exceeded its powers in requiring that Americans obtain insurance
by 2014 or pay a penalty, the centerpiece provision in the law
revamping the healthcare market, which accounts for nearly 18
percent of the nation’s economy.

Mar 5, 2012

Top court sets new arguments on human rights suits

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Supreme Court said on Monday it would hear arguments next term on whether an 18th century U.S. law can be used to sue multinational corporations or others in American courts for alleged human rights abuses committed abroad.

The justices said in a brief order they would consider during rearguments in the case whether the 1789 U.S. law at issue, the Alien Tort Statute, extended to conduct that occurred

Feb 28, 2012

US top court hears corporate human rights case

WASHINGTON, Feb 28 (Reuters) – A number of Supreme
Court justices expressed skepticism on Tuesday that corporations
can be sued in the United States for alleged complicity in human
rights abuses abroad, a case with important financial, legal and
international implications.

The high court during arguments considered limiting the
reach of a 1789 U.S. law that was largely dormant for nearly two
centuries, but used in the past 20 years by foreign victims to
sue multinational corporations for abuses committed overseas.

Feb 27, 2012

US top court rejects states’ appeal on Great Lakes carp

WASHINGTON, Feb 27 (Reuters) – The U.S. Supreme Court
on Monday rejected an appeal by five states seeking an order
requiring that a range of steps be taken to keep the invading
Asian carp out of the Great Lakes where they are considered a
threat to fisheries.

The high court refused to hear an appeal by Michigan,
Minnesota, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin after the states
lost their bid for a preliminary injunction that would have
required additional efforts to stop the migration of the
voracious carp into the lakes.

Feb 24, 2012

Supreme Court to hear corporate human rights case

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The Supreme Court will weigh next week whether corporations can be sued in the United States for suspected complicity in human rights abuses abroad, in a case being closely watched by businesses concerned about long and costly litigation.

The high court on Tuesday will consider the reach of a 1789 U.S. law that had been largely dormant until 1980, when human rights lawyers started using it, at first to sue foreign government officials. Then, over the next 20 years, the lawyers used the law to target multinational corporations.

Feb 24, 2012

Preview-US top court to hear corporate human rights case

WASHINGTON, Feb 24 (Reuters) – The Supreme Court
will weigh next week whether corporations can be sued
in the United States for suspected complicity in human rights
abuses abroad, in a case being closely
watched by businesses concerned about long and costly
litigation.

The high court on Tuesday will consider the reach
of a 1789 U.S. law that had been largely dormant until 1980,
when human rights lawyers started using it, at first to sue
foreign government officials. Then, over the next 20 years, the
lawyers used the law to target multinational corporations.

Feb 21, 2012

Supreme Court to hear university race admissions case

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The Supreme Court said on Tuesday it would decide whether a state university may consider an applicant’s race to achieve a more diverse student body, revisiting a divisive social issue it last addressed nine years ago.

The high court agreed to hear an appeal by a white female applicant, Abigail Fisher, who was denied undergraduate admission in 2008 to the University of Texas at Austin.

Feb 21, 2012

U.S. top court won’t hear grandparents visitation case

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to decide an issue it last addressed in 2000 on whether grandparents who seek court-ordered visitation of their grandchildren when the parents object must prove a compelling circumstance for the visit.

The high court refused to hear a case from Alabama on whether it violated constitutional due process rights to require proof by the grandparents of a compelling circumstance, such as parental unfitness or preventing harm to the children.