Jilian's Feed
Jul 19, 2012

U.S. recession’s other victim: public universities

NEW YORK (Reuters) – For generations, most college-bound Americans paid reasonable fees to attend publicly financed state universities.

But the bedrock of that system is fracturing as cash-strapped states slash funding to these schools just as attendance has soared. Places like Ohio State, Penn State and the University of Michigan now receive less than 7 percent of their budgets from state appropriations.

May 28, 2012

Spring revival for America’s housing market

NEW YORK, May 28 (Reuters) – Kate Carpenter and her husband
waited for two years before sensing the time was right to look
to buy a home in the suburbs of New York.

“This is the first time homes are at an affordable point,”
said the freelance writer, 35.

May 24, 2012

Facebook Lessons: What not to do when planning an IPO

NEW YORK May 24 (Reuters) – It’s been less than a week since
Facebook went public, and while the IPO made CEO Mark Zuckerberg
and many others very wealthy, the botched way in which the
offering was done has sparked investigations, lawsuits and
regulatory threats. It has also sparked a lot of anger toward
the social media company, lead underwriter Morgan Stanley and
the Nasdaq stock market.

Here is a list of eight things that went wrong with the
Facebook IPO – a “what not to do list” for the next big
technology company considering a public listing, compiled from
interviews with investors, traders, analysts, attorneys and
regulators.

May 16, 2012

Foreclosed Americans find way back to homeownership

NEW YORK, May 16 (Reuters) – When Jennifer Anderson’s family
could no longer afford their mortgage and lost their home, she
expected many years to pass before they would again become
property owners.

But less than two years later, in March, they purchased a
$297,000 house outside Phoenix, Arizona, after qualifying for a
loan backed by the U.S. government.

Apr 1, 2012

After grad job slump, big hiring is back at U.S. colleges

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Sean Chua expected the hunt for his first job after college to be tough. After all, he watched his brother struggle to find a position when he graduated back in 2008. But his fears were unwarranted. The 21-year-old justice major at American University sent out only seven resumes before getting an offer earlier this month from IBM for an IT consulting job, making him a beneficiary of a turnaround in the labor market for U.S. graduates. “My mom’s first position was with IBM so she is particularly proud,” says Chua. Hiring is back in a big way on many college campuses, one of several signs a recovery in the U.S. jobs market is gaining traction. After four years during which many students graduated to find no job and had only their loans to show for their studies, most college campuses are teeming with companies eager to hire. A survey by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) found 2012 hiring is expected to climb 10.2 percent, above a previous estimate of 9.5 percent.

Companies such as General Electric, Amazon, Apple and Barclays Global are looking for new staff, even if some firms remain below the pre-recession levels of new hiring. In another sign of the recovery, some first-time job seekers are receiving multiple offers.

Mar 22, 2012

Bank of PTA: Parents scramble to fill school budget gaps

(Refiling to fix headline)

By Jilian Mincer

NEW YORK, March 22(Reuters) – Rebecca Levey, co-president of
the Parent Association at the William T. Sherman School in New
York, is terrified about the school’s upcoming auction. A team
of experienced volunteers is managing the March 24 event which
will be held at a St. Paul’s the Apostle Church, and the stakes
are high.

The parent association at this Manhattan public school hopes
to raise about $300,000 from the event. That money helps pay for
a librarian, kindergarten assistants and numerous enrichment
programs – including chess and ballroom dancing – no longer
funded by the district. Overall, the parent association budget
is now $600,000, three times as much as it was when Levey’s
9-year-old twins started kindergarten at the Upper West Side
school. “The school budget really just covers staff,” she says.

Mar 7, 2012

Growing numbers work into retirement

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Kathy Frederick always assumed she would retire from her hospital administration job when she was around 60.

But as that date neared, she realized she wasn’t ready. She was healthy, enjoyed the work and liked the paycheck. So she decided to stick around. Now 65, Frederick works two days a week on special projects for Scripps Health’s human resources department in San Diego.

Mar 7, 2012

YOUR MONEY: Growing numbers work into retirement

NEW YORK, March 7 (Reuters) – Kathy Frederick always
assumed she would retire from her hospital administration job
when she was around 60.

But as that date neared, she realized she wasn’t ready. She
was healthy, enjoyed the work and liked the paycheck. So she
decided to stick around. Now 65, Frederick works two days a week
on special projects for Scripps Health’s human resources
department in San Diego.

Feb 10, 2012

For America’s hard-hit homeowners, little relief from settlement

NEW YORK, Feb 10 (Reuters) – Crystal Morello’s family
pleaded for months with their lender for a cheaper mortgage on
their family home in Belleville, Michigan. But time ran out last
summer, and they left before they were evicted.

“The bank was reassuring us that it was helping us out,”
says Morello, 26. “While we were getting a loan modification in
one department, we were getting foreclosed in another.”

Feb 3, 2012

Analysis: Some colleges cut tuition, hasten graduation

By Jilian Mincer and Stephanie Simon

(Reuters) – Even before President Barack Obama announced plans last month to push colleges to improve affordability, a number of schools beat him to the punch by lowering tuition and helping students graduate in fewer semesters.

These schools — typically small private colleges like University of Charleston, Cabrini College and Midland University that lack the cachet of top-tier colleges and compete with less expensive state schools — are bucking the widespread trend of increasing costs. In the last year, a few have cut tuition by as much as 20 percent. Others promise that students will earn their degree in four years or the college will pick up the cost of additional coursework.