Joan's Feed
Nov 8, 2012

Obama may now seek to make deeper mark on U.S. high court

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Barack Obama’s election victory on Tuesday may give him the opportunity to deepen his liberal imprint on the U.S. Supreme Court.

A Harvard law graduate who taught constitutional law, Obama, a Democrat, named two liberals to the high court during his first four-year term.

Nov 8, 2012

Analysis: Obama may now seek to make deeper mark on high court

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Barack Obama’s election victory on Tuesday may give him the opportunity to deepen his liberal imprint on the U.S. Supreme Court.

A Harvard law graduate who taught constitutional law, Obama, a Democrat, named two liberals to the high court during his first four-year term.

Nov 7, 2012

U.S. battle over ballots averted, but not forever

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – They sued early and often.

Voting-rights advocates, along with the U.S. Department of Justice and some political party officials, tackled potential electoral problems early this election year. Judges blocked stringent voter ID laws, lifted registration restrictions and rejected limits on early voting.

As a result, Election Day 2012 escaped the legal dramas of the past. While some local skirmishes landed in court, no litigation clouded President Barack Obama’s victory on Tuesday over Republican challenger Mitt Romney.

Nov 7, 2012

Analysis: U.S. battle over ballots averted, but not forever

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – They sued early and often.

Voting-rights advocates, along with the U.S. Department of Justice and some political party officials, tackled potential electoral problems early this election year. Judges blocked stringent voter ID laws, lifted registration restrictions and rejected limits on early voting.

As a result, Election Day 2012 escaped the legal dramas of the past. While some local skirmishes landed in court, no litigation clouded President Barack Obama’s victory on Tuesday over Republican challenger Mitt Romney.

Oct 29, 2012

Undeterred by storm, U.S. top court sticks to schedule

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Hurricane Sandy may shut down much of the federal government and halt public transport in Washington, D.C., on Monday but it will be business as usual at the U.S. Supreme Court, where justices – appointed for life – pride themselves in all manner of staying power.

The country’s highest court is keeping to its oral-argument schedule and intends to hear cases through Wednesday, court spokeswoman Kathy Arberg said late on Sunday.

Oct 11, 2012

Analysis: Justice Kennedy the key to campus affirmative action

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – When it comes to the use of race in U.S. academic admissions, Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy stands alone. He has sided with conservative justices who want to curtail affirmative action, and has echoed liberals who want to ensure campus diversity.

The justice who could cast the deciding vote, Kennedy revealed concerns during oral arguments at the Supreme Court on Wednesday about the University of Texas’ favoring of minority applicants. Yet he also suggested he was not ready to roll back affirmative action or reverse a 2003 landmark decision.

Oct 11, 2012

Analysis – Justice Kennedy the key to U.S. campus affirmative action

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – When it comes to the use of race in U.S. academic admissions, Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy stands alone. He has sided with conservative justices who want to curtail affirmative action, and has echoed liberals who want to ensure campus diversity.

The justice who could cast the deciding vote, Kennedy revealed concerns during oral arguments at the Supreme Court on Wednesday about the University of Texas’ favouring of minority applicants. Yet he also suggested he was not ready to roll back affirmative action or reverse a 2003 landmark decision.

Oct 5, 2012

Republicans lead Obama in war for judicial dominance

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – When Barack Obama was elected president, critics and supporters alike thought the Democrat would move swiftly to appoint strong liberal judges to balance out Republicans’ longstanding push for a conservative judiciary. At the nation’s 13 powerful U.S. appeals courts, that has not happened.

Obama’s 30 appointees have generally been moderates who mainly served on lower courts and were often selected in consultation with Republican senators. The pattern contrasts with Obama’s Republican predecessors, dating back to Ronald Reagan, who quickly put forth prominent young conservatives, many of whom came from academia and had past political experience.

Oct 5, 2012

Analysis: Republicans lead Obama in war for judicial dominance

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – When Barack Obama was elected president, critics and supporters alike thought the Democrat would move swiftly to appoint strong liberal judges to balance out Republicans’ longstanding push for a conservative judiciary. At the nation’s 13 powerful U.S. appeals courts, that has not happened.

Obama’s 30 appointees have generally been moderates who mainly served on lower courts and were often selected in consultation with Republican senators. The pattern contrasts with Obama’s Republican predecessors, dating back to Ronald Reagan, who quickly put forth prominent young conservatives, many of whom came from academia and had past political experience.

Sep 9, 2012

Will acceptance of gays by high court influence rulings?

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – A tall, hulking man in his late 70s, William Rehnquist, then chief justice of the United States, crawled down on all fours to say hello to the two little girls who had scurried under the table when he approached at a luncheon.

Sally Rider and her partner Betsy had tried to teach their two preschool-age daughters how to shake hands with Rehnquist. At the time, Rider was his top aide.