Bureau Chief, UK and Ireland
Jodie's Feed
May 13, 2010
via UK News

New politics? Looks like more of the same to me

Photo

When I interviewed David Cameron earlier this year after an event at Thomson Reuters in which he, George Osborne and Ken Clarke delivered their views on the economy under a “Vote For Change” banner, I suggested that watching three white, middle-aged men talking about what was good for Britain didn’t feel much like change to me. Cameron jokingly replied that Clarke, 69, would be flattered to be described as middle-aged.

The Conservative leader then shifted in his seat, sat up straight and talked seriously about all the hard work his party was doing to field more female and ethnic minority candidates. His new Deputy Prime Minister, Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg, talks repeatedly of a “new politics” and how this time politicians will do things differently.

May 12, 2010

Factbox – Polices agreed by new coalition government

LONDON (Reuters) – Here are some of the policies in a coalition agreement between the Conservative Party and the Liberal Democrats.

The agreement calls for:

COALITION

– LibDems get five cabinet positions. Their leader Nick Clegg becomes deputy prime minister and treasury spokesman Vince Cable becomes business secretary.

May 12, 2010

Factbox: Polices agreed by UK’s new coalition government

LONDON (Reuters) – Here are some of the policies in a coalition agreement between Britain’s Conservative Party and the Liberal Democrats.

The agreement calls for:

COALITION

– LibDems get five cabinet positions. Their leader Nick Clegg becomes deputy prime minister and treasury spokesman Vince Cable becomes business secretary.

May 12, 2010

Policies agreed by UK’s new coalition government

LONDON, May 12 (Reuters) – Here are some of the policies in
a coalition agreement between Britain’s Conservative Party and
the Liberal Democrats.

The agreement calls for:

COALITION

— Lib Dems get five cabinet positions. Their leader Nick
Clegg becomes deputy prime minister and treasury spokesman Vince
Cable becomes business secretary.

May 12, 2010

Cameron leads Britain into new coalition era

LONDON (Reuters) – Britain’s first coalition government since 1945 started to sketch out its main policy goals on Wednesday with a core task being to tackle the country’s record budget deficit.

New Prime Minister David Cameron’s Conservatives and the smaller Liberal Democrats struck a coalition agreement early on Wednesday in a deal between two usually ideologically opposed parties that critics say will lead to future instability.

May 11, 2010

LibDems: kingmakers or poison tasters?

LONDON (Reuters) – The Liberal Democrats have suddenly found themselves in the full glare of the political spotlight. It’s an uncomfortable, and potentially dangerous, place.

An inconclusive election result last week — the first such outcome in more than 30 years — has handed the Liberal Democrats the balance of power.

May 11, 2010

UK’s third party: kingmakers or poison tasters?

LONDON (Reuters) – Britain’s third largest party has suddenly found itself in the full glare of the political spotlight. It’s an uncomfortable, and potentially dangerous, place.

An inconclusive election result last week — the first such outcome in more than 30 years — has handed the center-left Liberal Democrats the balance of power.

May 10, 2010

Possible Conservative-Lib Dem deals after UK vote

LONDON (Reuters) – Britain’s two main opposition parties, the centre-right Conservatives and the centre-left Liberal Democrats, are in talks on a possible government deal after an inconclusive election last week.

The Conservatives ended up as the largest party in parliament but without an overall majority — the first time no party has won more than 50 percent of the seats in parliament in almost three decades.

May 10, 2010

Factbox: Possible Conservative-Lib Dem deals after UK vote

LONDON (Reuters) – Britain’s two main opposition parties, the center-right Conservatives and the center-left Liberal Democrats, are in talks on a possible government deal after an inconclusive election last week.

The Conservatives ended up as the largest party in parliament but without an overall majority — the first time no party has won more than 50 percent of the seats in parliament in almost three decades.

May 10, 2010

Possible forms of government after election

LONDON (Reuters) – Conservative party has offered to work in government with the Liberal Democrats, after the Conservatives won most seats in a parliamentary election but failed to secure a majority.

Below is a look at various scenarios:

CONSERVATIVE MINORITY GOVERNMENT – CONFIDENCE AND SUPPLY

* Probability: possible

In a minority government run on a “confidence and supply” basis, a party strikes deals with others on a bill-by-bill basis.

    • About Jodie

      "Based in London, I manage our team of Reuters' text journalists and photographers here and in Dublin - covering everything from company news and economics to sport and culture. I have been with Reuters for 10 years, including three years spent covering equities in Johannesburg."
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