from The Great Debate:

Three ways Netanyahu actually lost last week’s Israeli election

By John Lloyd
March 23, 2015

A Likud party campaign poster depicting Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu lies on the ground in Jerusalem

A Likud party campaign poster depicting Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu lies on the ground in Jerusalem, March 17, 2015. REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun

from The Great Debate:

When is pornography a sign of women’s progress?

By John Lloyd
March 17, 2015

A protester takes part in a demonstration against new laws on pornography outside parliament in central London

A protester takes part in a demonstration against new British laws on pornography outside parliament in central London, Dec. 12, 2014. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

from The Great Debate:

The most important man in Europe you’ve never heard of

By John Lloyd
March 9, 2015

Guardia di Finanza troops stand before the Quirinale palace in Rome, April 22, 2013. REUTERS/Max Rossi

Guardia di Finanza troops stand before the Quirinale palace in Rome, April 22, 2013. REUTERS/Max Rossi

from The Great Debate:

Lessons from the death of Russia’s Boris Nemtsov, a Putin foe

By John Lloyd
February 28, 2015

A woman reacts as she visits the site where Boris Nemtsov was recently murdered, in central Moscow

A woman reacts as she visits the site where Boris Nemtsov was recently murdered, in central Moscow, Feb. 28, 2015. REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin

from The Great Debate:

Meet the four autocrats of the apocalypse

By John Lloyd
January 16, 2015

Russian President Putin attends a meeting with his counterpart from Venezuela Maduro at the Novo-Ogaryovo state residence outside Moscow

Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a meeting with his counterpart from Venezuela, Nicolas Maduro, Jan. 15, 2015. REUTERS/Pavel Golovkin/Pool

from The Great Debate:

Russian, Chinese ‘news’ coming to a TV near you

By John Lloyd
December 29, 2014

Russian President Vladimir Putin is seen on the screen of a television camera during his visit to the new studio complex of television channel 'Russia Today' in Moscow

Earlier this month, the British Broadcasting Corporation, which sees itself as still the best broadcaster in the world, gave a well-bred expression of fear. Peter Horrocks, who has just stepped down as head of the BBC World Service, said “we are being financially outgunned by Russia and the Chinese (broadcasters) … the role we need to play is an even handed one. We shouldn’t be pro one side or the other, we need to provide something people can trust.”

The problem(s) with Israel

By John Lloyd
November 20, 2014

Israeli Ultra-Orthodox Jews carry the body of Rabbi Mosheh Twersky onto a vehicle during his funeral in Jerusalem

Israel had grown accustomed to an absence of terrorist attacks in its cities: so the bloody murder of four worshippers and wounding of eight more at a Jerusalem synagogue on Tuesday was a shock. It illuminates the fragile, fractious state of the country, including the fact that the cabinet is riven, and may collapse soon.

U.S. ‘soft power’ hits another hard reality in the Middle East

By John Lloyd
November 12, 2014

Relatives of detained activists cry and pray for them as the activists stand trial at a court in Cairo

On Sunday, June 22, 1941, Winston Churchill’s private secretary, John Colville, woke him with the news that Nazi Germany had invaded the Soviet Union. In a radio address that same evening, the British prime minister repeated his “consistent” opposition to communism, but said that “all this flashes away … the Russian danger is therefore our danger.” In a later House of Commons debate, Churchill quipped — “If Hitler invaded Hell, I would at least make a favorable reference to the devil in the House of Commons.”

Should the West withdraw from the world to win its love?

By John Lloyd
November 6, 2014

Soldiers from the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st rest as they wait to pack their weapons for shipment back to the United States at Camp Virginia, Kuwait

In his original and argumentative history of the Anglo-American domination of the past three or more centuries, Walter Russell Mead writes that both the UK and the United States believed their imposition of a world order served the highest interests of humanity. From Oliver Cromwell’s denunciation of Spanish cruelty in the 1650s to Ronald Reagan’s characterisation of the Soviet Union as an evil empire in the 1980s, the two main Anglophone states have seen their global expansionism as a blessing for the world: what’s good for us is good for everyone.

Ukraine’s vote proves Putin wrong and puts anti-Semitic past behind

By John Lloyd
October 31, 2014

Local resident listens before receiving a ballot during a parliamentary election inside her house in the village of Havronshchyna near Kiev

One of the themes that Russian President Vladimir Putin tried out to besmirch the Ukrainian revolt against pro-Russian President Viktor Yanukovich earlier this year was that fascists and anti-Semites were behind the uprising. The protesters, he proclaimed, were revolting in both senses of the word: They had chased out an elected president (true) and their actions had allowed “anti-Semitic forces [to go] on a rampage” (not true).