Comments on: France’s taxing expatriates http://blogs.reuters.com/john-lloyd/2012/12/26/frances-taxing-expatriates/ Wed, 13 Apr 2016 01:13:45 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: ARJTurgot2 http://blogs.reuters.com/john-lloyd/2012/12/26/frances-taxing-expatriates/#comment-1443 Sat, 29 Dec 2012 16:56:21 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/john-lloyd/?p=617#comment-1443 John, if you haven’t already, read ‘That Sweet Enemy’ by Robert and Isabelle Tombs. It’s a history of cultural differences between France and England. Thick, but well done and quite interesting/amusing. He’s English and studied in France, she’s French and studied in England.

Petain in the 1940’s rejected the Revolutionary ideals, though of course came to grief with the collaboration. De Gaulle was seriously dedicated to the upper-class and successfully destroyed the Fourth Republic, but came to grief in ’68 with his inflexibility.

France is schitzo. Most countries are, but most don’t have quite the legacy of cutting off heads. At one time much of upper NY state was settled by French emigres from the Revolution, living in genteel poverty, at the current time the [wealthy] senior management in its banking sector is very much a closed and family affair. So Depardieu is noteworthy only for making the news, otherwise seems a rather conventional Frenchman.

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By: CaptnCrunch http://blogs.reuters.com/john-lloyd/2012/12/26/frances-taxing-expatriates/#comment-1440 Fri, 28 Dec 2012 13:20:12 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/john-lloyd/?p=617#comment-1440 Great op-ed John, and as usual the cacophony of the comments makes an interesting epilogue. Mon Dieu!

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By: borisjimbo http://blogs.reuters.com/john-lloyd/2012/12/26/frances-taxing-expatriates/#comment-1439 Fri, 28 Dec 2012 06:53:08 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/john-lloyd/?p=617#comment-1439 Oh please, he left because he’s one of those people for whom far more than most others just isn’t enough.

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By: Acetracy http://blogs.reuters.com/john-lloyd/2012/12/26/frances-taxing-expatriates/#comment-1438 Fri, 28 Dec 2012 01:15:28 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/john-lloyd/?p=617#comment-1438 Depardieu seems to easily forget the $millions that the French government over the past century has invested in French cinema. Where Hollywood basically overtook film making worldwide, France has held its own, providing actors like Depardieu a career in his own language.

So now that Depardieu has $millions to live off of, he can’t do his part for the next generation of French film?

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By: americanguy http://blogs.reuters.com/john-lloyd/2012/12/26/frances-taxing-expatriates/#comment-1437 Thu, 27 Dec 2012 15:46:51 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/john-lloyd/?p=617#comment-1437 I always thought Depardieu is a lousy actor. He is also fat and ugly. I have no idea how he made his way into movies. Just as long as he does not move to the USA and drive around drunk over here in a high powered exotic car.

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By: ofilha http://blogs.reuters.com/john-lloyd/2012/12/26/frances-taxing-expatriates/#comment-1436 Thu, 27 Dec 2012 15:20:52 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/john-lloyd/?p=617#comment-1436 Property is a human construct without any real meaning except for laws. And laws are made to protect the wealthy, that’s why Lenin said that we need to replace the dictatorship of the capitalist with the dictatorship of the working class. That however did not go so well. But the fact remains that the planet does not belong to anybody and when the next medium size meteorite comes around it will prove my point. But for a short end to this rant, adieu Monsieur Gerard Depardieu and good ridance. I never found his movies interesting anyway.

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By: jaham http://blogs.reuters.com/john-lloyd/2012/12/26/frances-taxing-expatriates/#comment-1435 Thu, 27 Dec 2012 15:11:16 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/john-lloyd/?p=617#comment-1435 Is that the same Detroit agreement that marked the decline of the competitiveness of our auto industry, the beginning of defined benefit legacy costs that bankrupted GM and led to thousands of layoffs….yes, I believe it was.

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By: tmc http://blogs.reuters.com/john-lloyd/2012/12/26/frances-taxing-expatriates/#comment-1434 Thu, 27 Dec 2012 12:00:44 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/john-lloyd/?p=617#comment-1434 As long as the global economy continues and nationalism stays subdued, then this trend will not only continue but increase. The wealthy being under attack domestically and morally challenged by their global peers will most likely seek respite by moving to the most friendly and advantageous places. Global corporations will soon seek international autonomy as more and more countries try to tax and leverage them for their purposes. We are seeing the beginnings of this with the current labor and corporate moves within the US and other countries, and globally with places like Dubai, Macau, and the cruise ships converted to floating international homes.
I agree with @LysanderTucker in that we should change the game, not the players.
In the game of Monopoly, the game always ends. It may take a few days with an honest banker, but inevitably it will end. If I were to play a game based on our economics, I would hope the game never ended.

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By: OneOfTheSheep http://blogs.reuters.com/john-lloyd/2012/12/26/frances-taxing-expatriates/#comment-1433 Thu, 27 Dec 2012 06:40:49 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/john-lloyd/?p=617#comment-1433 “Chrystia Freeland…writes of a period in the U.S. recent history, from the 50s to the 70s, when divisions of wealth actually lessened….partly attributed to “the Detroit Agreement,” an accord signed in 1950 between the U.S. car companies and the auto workers’ union that traded industrial peace for high wages and health and other benefits.”

A rose by any other name…Ms. Freeland rushes forward to enthusiastically embrace the industrial blackmail by which unions attained a privileged place in the American economic system of that period. No matter that the “special status” of union workers was paid for by every non-union American buying an American-made car?

I grew to maturity during that period. My first new car was NOT an American one. It was an Austin Healey Sprite. It was human in size, as opposed to elephantine. It “handled”, as opposed to gliding one in cushioned comfort to the scene of an accident when circumstances dictated a sudden stop or change in direction of travel.

As I came to appreciate quality construction, reasonable price, reliability and economy of operation, I switched, like most enthusiasts, to Japanese cars; my first being one of the “original” 1970 240Z coupes. I still have it. Other Americans had flocked to the VW , the Datsun 510, the Volvo and the Mercedes for better value.

That “…Detroit Agreement” set in motion the repudiation by more and more Americans of oversized, outmoded poorly designed domestic vehicles. Far too heavy for the purpose intended, the typical American car of that period required an inordinate amount of raw materials to construct, 100,000 miles of reliable service was only rarely achieved, and the quantity of gasoline consumed to go that distance would today earn one a “Friend of OPEC” bumper sticker.

Today I still greatly enjoy driving a 1999 Chevy Metro 3-door hatchback with a manual transmission, bought new. At just over 120,000 miles, it should serve as my primary transportation to 200,000 miles and beyond.

It can cruise at 80 mph without strain and still deliver 34-38 mpg. It delivers 40,000 miles on a set of 13″ Michelin tires. Made in Canada to my specification (waited four months), GM only sold this vehicle because such subterfuge was the only way they could achieve their federally mandated “fleet mileage” of that time. It was REALLY the Suzuki “Swift”.

Americans are not all permanently brainwashed by union propagandists. I just LOVE to hear that union chorus that “we’re ALL in this together”! Union bumper stickers SHOULD say “Live better…at the expense of every non-union worker buying a union-made product.”

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By: paulmcg0 http://blogs.reuters.com/john-lloyd/2012/12/26/frances-taxing-expatriates/#comment-1432 Thu, 27 Dec 2012 05:03:07 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/john-lloyd/?p=617#comment-1432 I congratulate people who escape from a high tax regime such as France or the US. It’s like hiding your valuables from marauding barbarians. For example, Eduardo Saverin, one of Facebook’s founders, gave up his US citizenship and now is beyond the reach of the thieves in Washington, DC.

Governments are fighting back though. For example, see Senate bill S. 3205 that was introduced this year, the ex-PATRIOT Act, which would ban people who left the US for taxes reasons from re-entering the country among other provisions. The US government is proclaiming that you are its slave in perpetuity and your property is theirs.

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