from The Great Debate:

Ed Miliband’s Obama-inspired rhetoric didn’t play in the UK

By John Lloyd
May 8, 2015

Britain's opposition Labour Party leader Ed Miliband announces his resignation as leader at a news conference in London

Britain's opposition Labour Party leader Ed Miliband announces his resignation as leader at a news conference in London, Britain May 8, 2015. REUTERS/Neil Hall

from The Great Debate:

Britain prepares for a campaign into political turbulence

By John Lloyd
April 10, 2015

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron stands alongside Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg, and Ed Miliband the leader of the opposition Labour Party as they attend the Commemoration Service for Afghanistan at St Paul's Cathedral in London

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron (L) stands alongside Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg, and Ed Miliband the leader of the opposition Labour Party at St Paul's Cathedral in London, March 13, 2015. REUTERS/Pool/John Stillwell

A tale of two citizenships

By John Lloyd
November 12, 2013

When New York City Mayoral-elect Bill de Blasio strode on stage for his victory speech last week, he said that “the people of this city have chosen a progressive path.” But will they stick with it (and him)?

In Britain, a summer of quiet revolution

By John Lloyd
July 16, 2013

The British Isles are sentries in a turning world. The monarchy, pageantry, the mediaeval House of Lords, titles, accents, the established Church of England with the Queen at its head — they all give the adroit illusion of continuity and the primacy of tradition over change.

The politician’s hagio-biography

By John Lloyd
October 8, 2012

Last week, Ed Miliband, who wants to be Britain’s prime minister, had the kind of public event that changed people’s, or at least the media’s, perception of him: He was punchy, sharp, raspingly dismissive of the government’s strategy. The Labour Party leader, in his speech to the party’s annual conference, spoke for over an hour without notes, moved about the stage with apparent ease, and seemed in a fine, combative humor. He got good press, which he generally hasn’t for the first year of his leadership. It didn’t have quite the earth-moving quality of Mitt Romney’s steamrollering of President Obama a day later – another, and much greater, turnaround event for the man who wants the somewhat larger job of U.S. president. But Miliband did good.