from The Great Debate:

Alexander Litvinenko and Karl Marx’s stepchildren

By John Lloyd
January 27, 2016

Marina Litvinenko, the widow of murdered KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko, attends a demonstration in support of Boris Nemtsov, former deputy prime minister of Russia and prominent critic of Vladimir Putin, outside the Russian Embassy in London March 01, 2015. Nemstov was murdered two days ago as he walked across a bridge near the Kremlin in Moscow. REUTERS/Neil Hall (BRITAIN - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) - RTR4RN56

Marina Litvinenko, the widow of murdered KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko. REUTERS/Neil Hall

from The Great Debate:

Russia can only use the United States as an excuse for so long

By John Lloyd
December 29, 2015

Russian Matryoshka dolls decorated with images of U.S. President Barack Obama (R), his Russian counterpart Dmitry Medvedev (C) and Russia's Prime Minister Vladimir Putin are seen on display at a market in Moscow July 3, 2009.  REUTERS/Denis Sinyakov

This 2009 photo shows Russian matryoshka dolls decorated with images of President Barack Obama (R), then-Russian President Dmitry Medvedev (C) and Russia's then-Prime Minister Vladimir Putin. REUTERS/Denis Sinyakov

from The Great Debate:

The three gravest threats facing our world

By John Lloyd
October 18, 2015

Residents walk through the Breezy Point neighborhood which was left devastated by Hurricane Sandy in the New York borough of Queens

Residents walk through the Breezy Point neighborhood which was left devastated by Hurricane Sandy in the New York borough of Queens, November 12, 2012. REUTERS/Adrees Latif

from The Great Debate:

The whining of the militants

By John Lloyd
July 23, 2015

Still image taken from video of a man purported to be the reclusive leader of the militant Islamic State Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi making what would be his first public appearance at a mosque in Mosul

A man purported to be the reclusive leader of the militant Islamic State Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi has made what would be his first public appearance at a mosque in the centre of Iraq's second city, Mosul, according to a video recording posted on the Internet on July 5, 2014. REUTERS/Social Media Website via Reuters TV

from The Great Debate:

Why democracy may have been just a passing phase

By John Lloyd
June 1, 2015

Russia's President Vladimir Putin shakes hands with China's President Xi Jinping during their meeting at the Kremlin in Moscow

Russia's President Vladimir Putin (L) shakes hands with China's President Xi Jinping during their meeting at the Kremlin in Moscow, May 8, 2015. REUTERS/Mikhail Klimentyev/RIA Novosti/Kremlin

from The Great Debate:

Lessons from the death of Russia’s Boris Nemtsov, a Putin foe

By John Lloyd
February 28, 2015

A woman reacts as she visits the site where Boris Nemtsov was recently murdered, in central Moscow

A woman reacts as she visits the site where Boris Nemtsov was recently murdered, in central Moscow, Feb. 28, 2015. REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin

Ukraine’s vote proves Putin wrong and puts anti-Semitic past behind

By John Lloyd
October 31, 2014

Local resident listens before receiving a ballot during a parliamentary election inside her house in the village of Havronshchyna near Kiev

One of the themes that Russian President Vladimir Putin tried out to besmirch the Ukrainian revolt against pro-Russian President Viktor Yanukovich earlier this year was that fascists and anti-Semites were behind the uprising. The protesters, he proclaimed, were revolting in both senses of the word: They had chased out an elected president (true) and their actions had allowed “anti-Semitic forces [to go] on a rampage” (not true).

Is ‘civil society’ imperialistic? Putin says yes, and he’s not alone.

By John Lloyd
October 4, 2014

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The word “imperialism” is still bandied about a good deal. Sometimes its meaning is traditional, as in the charge that President Vladimir Putin’s Russia is seeking to reassemble some part of the Russian imperium. Sometimes the meaning is flakier, as in the claim of Scots nationalists that England is a neo-imperial state on the lookout for wars in which to flex its flabby military muscles.

Ukraine’s future lies with the West, but there is much suffering ahead

By John Lloyd
September 19, 2014

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Ukraine did something very Ukrainian this week. It sued for peace with Russia, apparently confirming a centuries-old subordination to Big Brother to the east. Yulia Tymoshenko, the former prime minister jailed by the deposed President Victor Yanukovich and now leader of the political party Batkivshchyna, called the laws implementing peace by granting autonomy to parts of eastern Ukraine “humiliating and betraying.”

In clashes over Ukraine or Iraq, liberty must be defended

By John Lloyd
September 5, 2014

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A few weeks after Winston Churchill became British prime minister in 1940, he had to tell the House of Commons that Britain had just suffered one of the worst military defeats in its history. He announced the setback with these words: