Opinion

John C. Abell

With Maps, Apple’s lost

Nov 29, 2012 23:20 UTC

The Apple Maps fiasco has become terribly overblown, if not hysterical.

It started with the fanfare release of the iPhone 5 and its software upgrade in September, which included a big switch from Google Maps to a homegrown alternative from Apple. The upgrade did not go well. Almost immediately, users began noticing that the maps were … unreliable. Not bad enough to slow iPhones sales but bad enough to dominate the news cycle for days.

But the damage was already done. Everyone seemed to be having a field day with Apple’s self-inflicted wound. More than two months later, the drama continues.

This week, Apple fired a senior executive, Map Division head Richard Williamson. Previously, Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook showed Scott Forstall, senior vice president of iOS Software, the door when he wouldn’t go on his own. Cook himself wrote a quick and sincere apology, which seemed to quiet the clamor.

In the tech press, too, things got gleefully hyperbolic. In September, Forbes contributor Peter Cohan wrote of “Apple Maps’ Six Most Epic Fails” — which included bad renderings of three bridges, the lack of Jerusalem, and a route to a Washington airport that, assuming a  complete idiot of a driver, might lure a vehicle to a fence near a runway instead of passenger arrivals. Huffington Post’s Britney Fitzgerald described the maps as “pretty ridiculously horrible.” Marguerite Reardon at CNET also left nothing to the imagination: “Apple Maps Stinks.”

There have been voices of reason. Consumer Reports — which did not recommend the iPhone 4 because of a problem with its antenna — said Apple’s maps were “competent enough.” Then there was NBC News digital technology and science editor, Wilson Rothman, whose tongue-in-cheek piece report begins thusly:

The Facebook Doctrine

Nov 23, 2012 19:41 UTC

Instagram, the mobile photo sharing app that Facebook bought for about $700 million, has been doing something new over the past few weeks. Up until now, one couldn’t see all of a user’s Instagrams online, the way you could, say, see all of a Twitter users’ tweets. But in recent weeks, users’ collections have been uploaded to the Internet automatically (see my profile page as an example). Instagram never bothered to ask for permission. Don’t want people to be able to easily access all your pictures from your Web browser? Too bad.

Between the Instagram change and other more substantive and complex alterations to Facebook’s user-feedback policy this week, the world’s largest social network has a clear modus operandi: What’s good for Facebook is good for you. This is the Facebook Doctrine.

Along with relatively innocuous Instagram changes came word that Facebook intends to eliminate its very modest experiment with democracy. It was a scheme by which members could undo changes (but still not stop them from happening before they took place). The rules Facebook put in place established a transparent process: A policy could be reversed if it received more than 7,000 comments, more than 30 percent of people on Facebook participated in a vote, and if that plurality voted against it.

Have AOL and Yahoo picked up the pieces?

Nov 14, 2012 14:14 UTC

“There are no second acts in American lives.” — F. Scott Fitzgerald

Good thing Fitzgerald didn’t live long enough to tell that to AOL and Yahoo, which are confounding wet blankets with sparks of renewed life and relevance. The bit of renaissance for these Internet pioneers comes when Google and Apple are in a bit of a rut and Facebook seems to have found its bottom. (The one constant: Groupon and Zynga are still floundering.)

None of these things are related, of course. There is no astrology of technology, aligning the stars in such a way as to favor some and deny others. Tech success isn’t a zero-sum game, especially when valuations aren’t everything. Just look at Apple’s rise and fall and rebirth.

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