Jonathan's Feed
Feb 7, 2011
via FaithWorld

Muslim-Christian unity at Tahrir Square

Photo

(A Muslim holding the Koran (top L) and a Coptic Christian holding a cross are carried through opposition supporters in Tahrir Square in Cairo February 6, 2011/Dylan Martinez)

Muslim-Christian unity was one of the themes on Tahrir Square, focus of the Cairo protests against President Hosni Mubarak, on Sunday. Members of Egypt’s Coptic Christian minority said mass in the square and many of the placards combined the Muslim crescent and the Christian cross. “Hand in hand” was a common chant.

Feb 6, 2011

Protesters in Cairo square settle in for long stay

CAIRO (Reuters) – Morning coffee is brewing on the wood fire outside Mohamed Awad’s plastic sheeting shelter in Tahrir Square, the hub of the Egyptian protest movement demanding the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak.

At a makeshift stall nearby he can buy a wide selection of newspapers to read over breakfast. After rare light rain overnight the sun is up, and sleepy heads are coming out of the blankets where they have spent another quiet night.

Feb 6, 2011

Balance of power between Mubarak and opponents

CAIRO (Reuters) – The balance between the two sides in the Egyptian crisis is at a delicate juncture and it is still too early to see how the confrontation will end.

Here is a summary of the sources of strength of the two sides:

THE PROTEST MOVEMENT

* The protesters have the numbers, for the moment. The movement brought more than one million people onto the streets last Tuesday and its rally in central Cairo on Friday was almost as well attended. The protests have also been massive in provincial cities and towns, especially Alexandria, Suez and the textile town of Mahalla in the Nile Delta. Rallies in favour of Mubarak have been much smaller. They started later and have already started to diminish. But some Egyptians say the government has made enough concessions and the protests should end. Many say they are tired of the disruption and losses the protests have caused.

Feb 5, 2011

Factbox: Balance of power between Mubarak and opponents

CAIRO (Reuters) – The balance between the two sides in the Egyptian crisis is at a delicate juncture and it is still too early to see how the confrontation will end.

Here is a summary of the sources of strength of the two sides:

THE PROTEST MOVEMENT

* The protesters have the numbers, for the moment. The movement brought more than one million people onto the streets last Tuesday and its rally in central Cairo on Friday was almost as well attended. The protests have also been massive in provincial cities and towns, especially Alexandria, Suez and the textile town of Mahalla in the Nile Delta. Rallies in favor of Mubarak have been much smaller. They started later and have already started to diminish. But some Egyptians say the government has made enough concessions and the protests should end. Many say they are tired of the disruption and losses the protests have caused.

Feb 4, 2011

Egyptian crowd tells Mubarak to go, minister visits

CAIRO (Reuters) – Tens of thousands of Egyptians gathered in Cairo’s Tahrir Square for an 11th day of protest on Friday calling for an immediate end to President Hosni Mubarak’s 30-year rule.

On what they called the “Day of Departure,” the crowd bowed in prayer and listened to a cleric declare: “We want the head of the regime removed.” “Leave! Leave! Leave!” they chanted.

Feb 4, 2011

Egyptians brace for new anti-Mubarak rally

CAIRO (Reuters) – Egyptians fighting to oust President Hosni Mubarak hoped to rally a million people on Friday as the United States worked to convince the 82-year-old leader to begin handing over power.

A senior U.S. official, who declined to be named, said on Thursday Washington was discussing with Egyptians different scenarios, including one in which Mubarak resigned immediately.

Feb 4, 2011

Egypt’s Mubarak says he won’t quit early

CAIRO (Reuters) – President Hosni Mubarak ruled out resigning immediately to end a violent confrontation over his 30-year-rule, arguing this would bring chaos to Egypt, but the New York Times said the Obama administration was in talks with Egyptian officials for him to quit now.

Speaking in an interview with ABC on Thursday, after bloodshed in Cairo that killed 10 people, the 82-year-old leader said he believed his country still needed him.

Feb 4, 2011

Mubarak says resigning would bring chaos

CAIRO (Reuters) – President Hosni Mubarak said on Thursday he wanted to quit but that he feared his resignation would bring chaos to Egypt, as protesters demanding an end to his 30-year rule clashed with his supporters on Cairo’s streets.

Mubarak’s government has struggled to regain control of a nation angry about poverty, recession and political repression, inviting Islamist opponents to talks and apologizing for Wednesday’s bloodshed in Cairo that left 10 people dead.

Feb 3, 2011

Lively community takes shape behind Cairo barricades

CAIRO (Reuters) – Beyond the barricades, beyond the sniping from the edges by people acting on behalf of President Hosni Mubarak, a new, festive and diverse slice of Egypt has suddenly appeared in the heart of the capital Cairo.

Tahrir Square has free food and drinks, a bandstand with live music, dedicated medical staff and a sense of community which Mubarak’s opponents say makes them proud of their country for the first time in decades.

Feb 3, 2011

Egypt’s Mubarak says resigning would bring chaos

CAIRO (Reuters) – President Hosni Mubarak said on Thursday he wanted to quit but that he feared his resignation would bring chaos to Egypt, as protesters demanding an end to his 30-year rule clashed with his supporters on Cairo’s streets.

Mubarak’s government has struggled to regain control of a nation angry about poverty, recession and political repression, inviting Islamist opponents to talks and apologising for bloodshed in Cairo that left 10 people dead.