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Oct 16, 2014

Experts fault changing U.S. guidelines on Ebola protective gear

CHICAGO (Reuters) – When Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), visited Ebola-stricken sites in West Africa last August, he was dressed in a full protective bodysuit and ventilator.

That level of protection was far greater than the basic gear the CDC initially recommended for U.S. hospital workers, which at minimum included a gown, a single pair of gloves, a mask and face shield.

Oct 16, 2014

Extreme measures: U.S. hospitals take on Ebola, but at what risk?

CHICAGO, Oct 16 (Reuters) – The infection of two U.S.
healthcare workers who cared for a dying Ebola patient in Dallas
is challenging assumptions about how to protect Western medical
workers who perform advanced, life-saving procedures that may
increase their risk of exposure.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the
infection of the two Dallas nurses likely occurred in the first
few days of patient Thomas Duncan’s admission to Texas Health
Presbyterian Hospital in late September, and is investigating
whether they correctly used personal protective gear such as
gloves and gowns recommended by the agency.

Oct 13, 2014

CDC head criticized for blaming ‘protocol breach’ as nurse gets Ebola

CHICAGO (Reuters) – Some healthcare experts are bristling at the assertion by a top U.S. health official that a “protocol breach” caused a Dallas nurse to be infected with Ebola while caring for a dying patient, saying the case instead shows how far the nation’s hospitals are from adequately training staff to deal with the deadly virus.

Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, made the declaration on Sunday at a news conference and called for an investigation into how the unidentified nurse became infected while caring for Liberian national Thomas Eric Duncan, the first Ebola patient diagnosed in the United States. Duncan died last week at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital.

Oct 13, 2014

U.S. CDC head criticized for blaming “protocol breach” as nurse gets Ebola

CHICAGO, Oct 13 (Reuters) – Some healthcare experts are
bristling at the assertion by a top U.S. health official that a
“protocol breach” caused a Dallas nurse to be infected with
Ebola while caring for a dying patient, saying the case instead
shows how far the nation’s hospitals are from adequately
training staff to deal with the deadly virus.

Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention, made the declaration on Sunday at a news
conference and called for an investigation into how the
unidentified nurse became infected while caring for Liberian
national Thomas Eric Duncan, the first Ebola patient diagnosed
in the United States. Duncan died last week at
Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital.

Oct 3, 2014

U.S. nurses say they are unprepared to handle Ebola patients

CHICAGO (Reuters) – Nurses, the frontline care providers in U.S. hospitals, say they are untrained and unprepared to handle patients arriving in their hospital emergency departments infected with Ebola.

Many say they have gone to hospital managers, seeking training on how to best care for patients and protect themselves and their families from contracting the deadly disease, which has so far killed at least 3,338 people in the deadliest outbreak on record.

Oct 2, 2014

U.S. nears solution for safe disposal of Ebola waste

WASHINGTON/CHICAGO (Reuters) – The United States is days away from settling the critical question of how hospitals should handle and dispose of medical waste from Ebola patients, a government official said on Wednesday.

Experts have warned that conflicting U.S. regulations over how such waste should be transported could make it very difficult for U.S. hospitals to safely care for patients with Ebola, a messy disease that causes diarrhea, vomiting and in some cases, bleeding from the eyes and ears.

Oct 2, 2014

Exclusive: U.S. nears solution for safe disposal of Ebola waste

WASHINGTON/CHICAGO (Reuters) – The United States is days away from settling the critical question of how hospitals should handle and dispose of medical waste from Ebola patients, a government official said on Wednesday.

Experts have warned that conflicting U.S. regulations over how such waste should be transported could make it very difficult for U.S. hospitals to safely care for patients with Ebola, a messy disease that causes diarrhea, vomiting and in some cases, bleeding from the eyes and ears.

Oct 1, 2014

Experts question two-day delay in admitting Texas Ebola patient

CHICAGO/NEW YORK (Reuters) – The first patient to be diagnosed with Ebola in a U.S. hospital was evaluated initially and turned away, a critical missed opportunity that could result in others being exposed to the deadly virus, infectious disease experts said.

On the patient’s first visit to Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas last Friday, he walked into the hospital presenting “non-specific symptoms” and was sent home with a prescription for antibiotics, Dr. Edward Goodman, an infectious disease specialist at the hospital, told a news conference on Tuesday.

Oct 1, 2014

Traveler from Liberia is first Ebola patient diagnosed in U.S.

By Julie Steenhuysen and Sharon Begley

(Reuters) – A man who flew from Liberia to Texas has become the first patient infected with the deadly Ebola virus to be diagnosed in the United States, health officials said on Tuesday, a sign the outbreak ravaging West Africa may spread globally.

The patient sought treatment six days after arriving in Texas on Sept. 20, Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), told reporters. He was admitted two days later to an isolation room at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas.

Sep 30, 2014

First Ebola case diagnosed in the United States -CDC

Sept 30 (Reuters) – U.S. health officials said on Tuesday
the first patient infected with the deadly Ebola virus had been
diagnosed in the country, in a new sign of how the outbreak
ravaging West Africa can spread globally.

The patient had recently traveled to West Africa and
developed symptoms several days after returning to Texas, state
officials said. The patient was admitted to an isolation room at
Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas.

    • About Julie

      "Julie Steenhuysen has been covering health and science topics for Reuters for the past decade, first as a medical device correspondent, then as team leader for the equities team covering U.S. pharmaceuticals and healthcare companies. For the past 4 years, Julie has worked as U.S. health and science correspondent, focusing on coverage for a general news audience."
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