EMEA Health and Science Correspondent
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Nov 5, 2015

New kind of “designer” immune cells clear baby’s leukaemia

LONDON, Nov 5 (Reuters) – A baby whom doctors thought almost
certain to die has been cleared of a previously incurable
leukaemia in the first human use of an “off-the-shelf” cell
therapy from Cellectis that creates designer immune
cells.

One-year-old Layla had run out of all other treatment
options when doctors at Britain’s Great Ormond Street Hospital
(GOSH) gave her the highly experimental, genetically edited
cells in a tiny 1-millilitre intravenous infusion.

Nov 4, 2015

OECD warns high-priced drugs are stretching health budgets

LONDON (Reuters) – Specialty medicines for which pharmaceutical companies demand high prices are straining wealthy nations’ health budgets, the OECD said on Wednesday, with drugs accounting for some 20 percent of all health spending.

Across the 33 OECD countries, pharmaceutical spending reached $800 billion in 2013, and new drugs and rising demand are likely to continue to push that level higher, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development said.

Oct 26, 2015

Insight: MERS, Ebola, bird flu: Science’s big missed opportunities

LONDON, (Reuters) – Anyone who goes down with flu in Europe this winter could be asked to enrol in a randomised clinical trial in which they will either be given a drug, which may or may not work, or standard advice to take bedrest and paracetamol.

Those who agree could be helping the world prepare for the next potentially deadly disease pandemic as well as helping scientists who are now desperate to plug gaps in knowledge left by previous missed opportunities.

Oct 26, 2015

Insight – MERS, Ebola, bird flu: Science’s big missed opportunities

LONDON (Reuters) – Anyone who goes down with flu in Europe this winter could be asked to enrol in a randomised clinical trial in which they will either be given a drug, which may or may not work, or standard advice to take bedrest and paracetamol.

Those who agree could be helping the world prepare for the next potentially deadly disease pandemic as well as helping scientists who are now desperate to plug gaps in knowledge left by previous missed opportunities.

Oct 26, 2015

MERS, Ebola, bird flu: Science’s big missed opportunities

LONDON, Oct 26 (Reuters) – Anyone who goes down with flu in
Europe this winter could be asked to enrol in a randomised
clinical trial in which they will either be given a drug, which
may or may not work, or standard advice to take bedrest and
paracetamol.

Those who agree could be helping the world prepare for the
next potentially deadly disease pandemic as well as helping
scientists who are now desperate to plug gaps in knowledge left
by previous missed opportunities.

Oct 21, 2015

UK Ebola nurse has meningitis caused by persisting virus: doctors

LONDON (Reuters) – A Scottish nurse who contracted and initially recovered from Ebola, but then suffered relapsing illness, has meningitis caused by the virus persisting in her brain, doctors treating her said on Wednesday.

Pauline Cafferkey was not reinfected with the Ebola virus, doctors said, but it had remained in her body since her initial recovery and had re-emerged to cause life-threatening complications.

Oct 15, 2015

UK Ebola “relapse” case takes virus specialists to uncharted waters

By Kate Kelland

LONDON(Reuters) – The case of Pauline Cafferkey, the first person known to have recovered from Ebola and then suffer an apparently life-threatening relapse, is taking scientists into uncharted territory.

The Scottish nurse’s critically ill situation, described as “staggering” by one British virologist, signals just how complex and formidable a foe the Ebola virus may turn out to be now that scientists have the chance to study its survivors.

Oct 15, 2015

When size matters, world rugby feels the impact

LONDON (Reuters) – When Daniel Wigley, who weighs 108 kilos and is two metres tall, jogs onto the field at his local rugby club in north London, he feels small.

Given his height and the position he plays in, Wigley wants to be heavier – with more muscle and bulk so he can jump higher and push harder.

Oct 14, 2015

Ebola survivors can harbor virus in semen for at least nine months

LONDON (Reuters) – Some male survivors of Ebola infection can harbor fragments of the virus in their semen for at least nine months after their initial infection – far longer than previously thought, scientists said on Wednesday.

In preliminary results which raise questions about how and when the West African epidemic can be brought to an end, researchers said they do not yet know whether the traces of virus found were live or potentially infectious.

Oct 9, 2015

Ebola’s persistence in survivors fuels concerns over future risks

LONDON, Oct 9 (Reuters) – A growing awareness of how the
Ebola virus can hide in parts of the body such as eyes, breasts
and testicles long after leaving the bloodstream raises
questions about whether the disease can ever be beaten.

Virologists said Friday’s case of a Scottish nurse, Pauline
Cafferkey, who had recovered from Ebola but is now suffering
complications adds to signs that the virus is a long-term health
risk and can lead to a “post-Ebola syndrome”.

    • About Kate

      "I cover health and science news for the region of Europe, Middle East and Africa -- from flu pandemics to the newest planetary discovery to the latest drug and research developments. I joined Reuters in 1993 and worked in London, Amsterdam and Frankfurt before moving to BBC television to work on European politics for Newsnight for 2 years. Since returning to Reuters, I have also worked as a parliamentary correspondent in Westminster and on the main news desk of the London bureau."
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