EMEA Health and Science Correspondent
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Jul 16, 2014

Scientific review finds asthma drugs suppress child growth

LONDON (Reuters) – Corticosteroid drugs given via inhalers to children with asthma may suppress their growth, according to two systematic reviews of scientific studies on the issue.

Health experts who conducted the review and published it in The Cochrane Library journal found that children’s growth slowed in the first year of treatment, although the effects were minimized by using lower doses.

Jul 16, 2014

Global AIDS epidemic can be controlled by 2030, U.N. says

LONDON (Reuters) – The United Nations said on Wednesday new HIV infections and deaths from AIDS were decreasing, making it possible to control the epidemic by 2030 and eventually end it “in every region, in every country”.

“More than ever before, there is hope that ending AIDS is possible. However, a business-as-usual approach or simply sustaining the AIDS response at its current pace cannot end the epidemic,” the U.N. AIDS program UNAIDS said in a global report issued ahead of an AIDS conference in Melbourne, Australia next week.

Jul 15, 2014

In the brain, sex addiction looks the same as drug addiction

LONDON (Reuters) – Pornography triggers brain activity in sex addicts similar to the effect drugs have on the brains of drug addicts, researchers said on Friday – but that doesn’t necessarily mean porn is addictive.

Although there are no precise figures, experts in the field believe as many as one in 25 adults is affected by compulsive sexual behavior, more commonly known as sex addiction – an obsession with sexual thoughts, feelings or behavior they are unable to control.

Jul 8, 2014

Study paves way for simple blood test to predict Alzheimer’s

LONDON (Reuters) – British scientists have identified a set of 10 proteins in the blood that can predict the onset of Alzheimer’s and call this an important step towards developing a test for the incurable brain-wasting disease.

Such a test could initially be used to select patients for clinical trials of experimental treatments being developed to try to halt progression of Alzheimer’s, the researchers said, and may one day move into routine use in doctors’ clinics.

Jul 7, 2014

Study paves the way for a blood test to predict Alzheimer’s

LONDON, July 8 (Reuters) – British scientists have
identified a set of 10 proteins in the blood that can predict
the onset of Alzheimer’s and call this an important step towards
developing a test for the incurable brain-wasting disease.

Such a test could initially be used to select patients for
clinical trials of experimental treatments being developed to
try to halt progression of Alzheimer’s, the researchers said,
and may one day move into routine use in doctors’ clinics.

Jul 6, 2014

Insight – How to fix a broken market in antibiotics

LONDON (Reuters) – The drugs don’t work – and neither does the market, when it comes to antibiotics.

When sophisticated bugs that medicines used to kill within days start to fight back and win, all of healthcare, and the people it keeps alive, is in trouble.

Jul 6, 2014

How to fix a broken market in antibiotics

LONDON, July 6 (Reuters) – The drugs don’t work – and
neither does the market, when it comes to antibiotics.

When sophisticated bugs that medicines used to kill within
days start to fight back and win, all of healthcare, and the
people it keeps alive, is in trouble.

Jul 2, 2014

Experimental Ebola drugs should be tried in Africa, disease expert says

By Kate Kelland

LONDON(Reuters) – People at high risk of dying in West Africa’s Ebola outbreak should be offered experimental medicines to see if they work, despite the drugs being not fully tested, the head of an influential global health charity said.

Jeremy Farrar, a professor of tropical medicine and director of The Wellcome Trust charity, said Ebola’s spread in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia is “out of control” and global health authorities should rethink the approach to potential treatments.

Jul 2, 2014

Nature journal retracts stem cell paper citing “critical errors”

LONDON, July 2 (Reuters) – A stem cell paper published by a
team of Japanese and American scientists in the influential
journal Nature has been retracted due to “several critical
errors”, the journal said on Wednesday.

The research, which when published in January was described
as game-changing by many experts in the field, was subsequently
investigated by Japan’s RIKEN scientific institute, which
“categorised some of the errors as misconduct”, Nature said.

Jun 30, 2014

Patients recruited for vital studies on Saudi MERS virus

By Kate Kelland

LONDON(Reuters) – Saudi Arabia says it has recruited patients for a crucial study on the source of the deadly MERS virus, acknowledging it is late but pledging more work on the epidemic after international criticism of its slow response.

Scientists and global public health experts have faulted Saudi Arabia’s response for allowing the spread of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) virus, which has now killed nearly 300 people inside the kingdom.

    • About Kate

      "I cover health and science news for the region of Europe, Middle East and Africa -- from flu pandemics to the newest planetary discovery to the latest drug and research developments. I joined Reuters in 1993 and worked in London, Amsterdam and Frankfurt before moving to BBC television to work on European politics for Newsnight for 2 years. Since returning to Reuters, I have also worked as a parliamentary correspondent in Westminster and on the main news desk of the London bureau."
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