EMEA Health and Science Correspondent
Kate's Feed
Oct 23, 2013

Feature: New China H7N9 strain gives kick to mutant bird flu research

ROTTERDAM, Netherlands (Reuters) – Dutch scientists hidden away in a top-security laboratory are seeking to create mutant flu viruses, dangerous work designed to prepare the world for a lethal pandemic by beating nature to it.

The idea of engineering viral pathogens to be more deadly than they are already has generated huge controversy, amid fears that such viruses could leak out or fall into the wrong hands.

Oct 23, 2013

New China H7N9 strain gives kick to mutant bird flu research

ROTTERDAM, Netherlands, Oct 23 (Reuters) – Dutch scientists
hidden away in a top-security laboratory are seeking to create
mutant flu viruses, dangerous work designed to prepare the world
for a lethal pandemic by beating nature to it.

The idea of engineering viral pathogens to be more deadly
than they are already has generated huge controversy, amid fears
that such viruses could leak out or fall into the wrong hands.

Oct 18, 2013

Pakistan polio outbreak puts global eradication at risk

LONDON (Reuters) – A Taliban ban on vaccination is exacerbating a serious polio outbreak in Pakistan, threatening to derail dramatic progress made this year towards wiping out the disease worldwide, health officials say.

Health teams in Pakistan have been attacked repeatedly since the Taliban denounced vaccines as a Western plot to sterilize Muslims and imposed bans on inoculation in June 2012.

Oct 17, 2013

Air pollution a leading cause of cancer – U.N. agency

LONDON/GENEVA, Oct 17 (Reuters) – The air we breathe is
laced with cancer-causing substances and is being officially
classified as carcinogenic to humans, the World Health
Organisation’s cancer agency said on Thursday.

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) cited
data indicating that in 2010, 223,000 deaths from lung cancer
worldwide resulted from air pollution, and said there was also
convincing evidence it increases the risk of bladder cancer.

Oct 17, 2013

Scans show retired American football players have brain deficits

LONDON, Oct 17 (Reuters) – Scientists have found “profound abnormalities” in scans of brain activity in a group of retired American football players, adding to evidence indicating that repeated blows to the head can trigger longer-term aggression and dementia.

Although the former National Football League (NFL) players in the study were not diagnosed with any neurological conditions, brain-imaging tests showed unusual activity that correlated with the number of times they had left the field with a head injury during their football careers.

Oct 17, 2013

UN agency calls outdoor air pollution leading cause of cancer

LONDON, Oct 17 (Reuters) – The air we breathe is laced with
cancer-causing substances and should now be classified as
carcinogenic to humans, the World Health Organisation’s (WHO)
cancer agency said on Thursday.

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) cited
data indicating that in 2010, 223,000 deaths from lung cancer
worldwide resulted from air pollution, and said there was also
convincing evidence it increases the risk of bladder cancer.

Oct 8, 2013

Aircraft noise linked to higher risk of heart disease and stroke

LONDON (Reuters) – Exposure to high levels of aircraft noise near busy international airports has been linked to a higher risk of heart disease and strokes in two separate studies from Britain and the United States.

Researchers in London studied data on noise and hospital admissions around London Heathrow airport while a separate team analyzed data for more than 6 million Americans living near 89 U.S. airports in 2009.

Oct 7, 2013

GSK aims to market world’s first malaria vaccine

LONDON (Reuters) – British drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline will seek marketing approval for the world’s first malaria vaccine next year after trial data showed the shot significantly cut cases of the disease in African children.

The vaccine known as RTS,S was found, after 18 months of follow-up, to have almost halved the number of malaria cases in young children in the trial, and to have reduced by around a quarter the number of malaria cases in infants.

Oct 3, 2013

Diesel exhaust pollution may disrupt honeybee foraging

LONDON (Reuters) – Exposure to pollution from diesel exhaust fumes can disrupt honeybees’ ability to recognize the smells of flowers and could in future affect pollination and global food security, researchers said on Thursday.

In a study published in the Nature journal Scientific Reports, scientists from Britain’s University of Southampton found that the fumes change the profile of the floral odors that attract bees to forage from one flower to the next.

Oct 2, 2013

Exercise “as good as medicines” in treating heart disease

LONDON (Reuters) – Exercise may be just as good as medication to treat heart disease and should be included as a comparison when new drugs are being developed and tested, scientists said on Wednesday.

In a large review published in the British Medical Journal, researchers from Britain’s London School of Economics and Harvard and Stanford universities in the United States found no statistically detectable differences between exercise and drugs for patients with coronary heart disease or prediabetes, when a person shows symptoms that may develop into full-blown diabetes.

    • About Kate

      "I cover health and science news for the region of Europe, Middle East and Africa -- from flu pandemics to the newest planetary discovery to the latest drug and research developments. I joined Reuters in 1993 and worked in London, Amsterdam and Frankfurt before moving to BBC television to work on European politics for Newsnight for 2 years. Since returning to Reuters, I have also worked as a parliamentary correspondent in Westminster and on the main news desk of the London bureau."
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