EMEA Health and Science Correspondent
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Sep 12, 2013

Global Fund seeks $15 billion to control three big killers

LONDON, Sept 12 (Reuters) – The world’s biggest funder of
the fight against AIDS, tuberculosis (TB) and malaria said on
Thursday it needs $15 billion over the next three years to begin
bringing “the three big global pandemics” under control.

In a report released ahead of a pledging conference later
this year, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria said
timely investments could avert $47 billion in extra treatment
costs and save millions of lives, but warned that acting too
late would mean missing important opportunities.

Sep 12, 2013

Huge tobacco use in India seen killing 1.5 million a year

LONDON (Reuters) – Tobacco inflicts huge damage on the health of India’s people and could be clocking up a death toll of 1.5 million a year by 2020 if more users are not persuaded to kick the habit, an international report said on Thursday.

Despite having signed up to a global treaty on tobacco control and having numerous anti-tobacco and smoke-free laws, India is failing to implement them effectively, leaving its people vulnerable to addiction and ill health, according to the report by the International Tobacco Control Project (ITCP).

Sep 11, 2013

Scientists grow new stem cells in a living mouse

LONDON (Reuters) – Scientists have succeeded in generating new stem cells in living mice and say their success opens up possibilities for the regeneration of damaged tissue in people with conditions ranging from heart failure to spinal cord injury.

The researchers used the same “recipe” of growth-boosting ingredients normally used for making stem cells in a petri dish, but introduced them instead into living laboratory mice and found they were able to create so-called reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells).

Sep 9, 2013

Insight: Research renaissance offers new ways out of depression

LONDON (Reuters)- As Susan sits chatting to a nurse in a London clinic, a light tapping sound by her head signals that parts of her brain are being zapped by thousands of tiny electro-magnetic pulses from a machine plugged into the wall.

The 50 year-old doctor is among growing ranks of people with so-called treatment-resistant depression, and after 21 years fighting a disorder that destroyed her ability to work and at times made her want to “opt out of life”, this is a last resort.

Sep 9, 2013

Research renaissance offers new ways out of depression

LONDON, Sept 9 (Reuters)- As Susan sits chatting to a nurse
in a London clinic, a light tapping sound by her head signals
that parts of her brain are being zapped by thousands of tiny
electro-magnetic pulses from a machine plugged into the wall.

The 50 year-old doctor is among growing ranks of people with
so-called treatment-resistant depression, and after 21 years
fighting a disorder that destroyed her ability to work and at
times made her want to “opt out of life”, this is a last resort.

Sep 7, 2013

cigarettes as good as nicotine patches in helping smokers quit

LONDON (Reuters) – Smokers who switch to electronic cigarettes to try to kick their habit are at least as likely to succeed in quitting or cutting down as users of nicotine patches, according to research published on Sunday.

In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers compared electronic, or e-cigarettes, with the more standard nicotine replacement therapy patches.

Sep 3, 2013

Scientists find possible new way of fighting high blood pressure

LONDON (Reuters) – Scientists experimenting with rats have found that de-activating certain nerves in the neck can effectively treat high blood pressure – a discovery that could be an advance in tackling one of the world’s biggest silent killers.

Researchers at Britain’s Bristol University found that in rats with high blood pressure, when they removed nerve links between the brain and the carotid body – a nodule about the size of a grain of rice on the side of each carotid artery – the animals’ blood pressure fell and remained low.

Sep 1, 2013

Bigger and healthier: European men grow 11cm in a century

LONDON, Sept 2 (Reuters) – The average height of European
men grew by a surprising 11 centimetres from the early 1870s to
1980, reflecting significant improvements in health across the
region, according to new research published on Monday.

Contrary to expectations, the study also found that average
height accelerated in the period spanning the two World Wars and
the Great Depression, when poverty, food rationing and hardship
of war might have been expected to limit people’s growth.

Aug 29, 2013

Study finds poverty reduces brain power

LONDON (Reuters) – Poverty and the all-consuming fretting that comes with it require so much mental energy that the poor have little brain power left to devote to other areas of life, according to the findings of an international study published on Thursday.

The mental strain could be costing poor people up to 13 IQ (intelligence quotient) points and means they are more likely to make mistakes and bad decisions that amplify and perpetuate their financial woes, researchers found.

Aug 28, 2013

Scientists grow “mini human brains” from stem cells

LONDON (Reuters) – Scientists have grown the first mini human brains in a laboratory and say their success could lead to new levels of understanding about the way brains develop and what goes wrong in disorders like schizophrenia and autism.

Researchers based in Austria started with human stem cells and created a culture in the lab that allowed them to grow into so-called “cerebral organoids” – or mini brains – that consisted of several distinct brain regions.

    • About Kate

      "I cover health and science news for the region of Europe, Middle East and Africa -- from flu pandemics to the newest planetary discovery to the latest drug and research developments. I joined Reuters in 1993 and worked in London, Amsterdam and Frankfurt before moving to BBC television to work on European politics for Newsnight for 2 years. Since returning to Reuters, I have also worked as a parliamentary correspondent in Westminster and on the main news desk of the London bureau."
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