EMEA Health and Science Correspondent
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Aug 5, 2013

First taste of test-tube burger declared ‘close to meat’

LONDON (Reuters) – The world’s first laboratory-grown beef burger was flipped out of a petri dish and into a frying pan on Monday, with food tasters declaring it tasted “close to meat”.

Grown in-vitro from cattle stem cells at a cost of 250,000 euros ($332,000), the burger was cooked and eaten in front of television cameras to gain the greatest media coverage for the culmination of a five-year science experiment.

Aug 2, 2013

Scientists to cook world’s first in-vitro beef burger

LONDON, Aug 2 (Reuters) – A corner of west London will see
culinary and scientific history made on Monday when scientists
cook and serve up the world’s first lab-grown beef burger.

The in-vitro burger, cultured from cattle stem cells, the
first example of what its creator says could provide an answer
to global food shortages and help combat climate change, will be
fried in a pan and tasted by two volunteers.

Jul 25, 2013

Deadly Middle East virus unlikely to cause SARS-like epidemic

LONDON, July 26 (Reuters) – Despite its high current death
rate, the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) that emerged
in Saudi Arabia last year is unlikely to cause a SARS-like
epidemic because it is not spreading as easily, scientists said
on Friday.

In the fullest clinical analysis yet of the new virus,
British and Saudi researchers said that while there are many
similarities between MERS and severe acute respiratory syndrome
(SARS) – which emerged in China in 2002 and killed around 800
people worldwide – there are also important differences.

Jul 25, 2013

CORRECTED (OFFICIAL)-WHO had asked India to ban toxin that killed children

NEW DELHI/LONDON, July 22 (Reuters) – The pesticide that
killed 23 Indian schoolchildren last week is a nerve poison
banned by many countries because of what the World Health
Organisation (WHO) describes as its “high acute toxicity”.

As early as 2009, the United Nations health agency urged
India to consider a ban on the pesticide monocrotophos – the
substance said by a magistrate investigating the deaths to be
the cause of the poisoning.

Jul 24, 2013

Scientists warn of overwhelming costs of mental illness

LONDON (Reuters) – Health systems could be “overwhelmed” by the costs of coping with mental illnesses such as dementia, depression and addiction if nothing is done now to boost investment in research, leading neuroscientists said on Thursday.

Publishing a study that put the estimated costs of brain disorders in Britain alone at more than 112 billion pounds ($172 billion) a year, they said mental illness research needed to attract the same funding levels as illnesses such as cancer and heart diseases to be able to reduce the burden.

Jul 22, 2013

WHO had asked India to ban toxin that killed children

NEW DELHI/LONDON (Reuters) – The pesticide that killed 23 Indian schoolchildren last week is a nerve poison banned by many countries because of what the World Health Organization (WHO) describes as its “high acute toxicity”.

As early as 2009, the United Nations health agency urged India to consider a ban on the pesticide monocrotophos – the substance said by a magistrate investigating the deaths to be the cause of the poisoning.

Jul 4, 2013

Study finds MERS virus has not yet reached pandemic potential

LONDON, July 5 (Reuters) – The Middle East coronavirus that
has killed 40 people since emerging late last year has not yet
reached pandemic potential and may simply die out, according to
new estimates of how easily it is transmitted.

In a study in The Lancet medical journal, researchers from
France’s Institut Pasteur in Paris analysed data on Middle East
respiratory syndrome (MERS) clusters and found its likelihood of
developing into a SARS-like worldwide epidemic was low.

Jul 4, 2013

Three million Europeans catch infections in hospital annually

LONDON (Reuters) – On any given day, some 80,000 patients in Europe are fighting an infection they picked up in hospital, often while in intensive care, the EU’s disease monitoring agency said in a survey published on Thursday.

Although some of these infections can be treated easily, others – like the superbug MRSA and other drug-resistant bugs – can be fatal or affect patients’ health very seriously, taking several months of costly hospital care and medication to beat.

Jul 3, 2013

Risk of birth defect doubles for cousin couples -study

LONDON (Reuters) – Children whose parents are cousins run more than double the risk of being born with a congenital abnormality, although the overall rate of such birth defects remains low, according to new research findings.

A large study in a British city with a large Pakistani community, where marriage between blood relatives is fairly common, found that so-called consanguineous parents accounted for more than 30 percent of birth defects in babies of Pakistani origin.

Jul 3, 2013

Scientists create human liver from stem cells

LONDON (Reuters) – Scientists have for the first time created a functional human liver from stem cells derived from skin and blood and say their success points to a future where much-needed livers and other transplant organs could be made in a laboratory.

While it may take another 10 years before lab-grown livers could be used to treat patients, the Japanese scientists say they now have important proof of concept that paves the way for more ambitious organ-growing experiments.

    • About Kate

      "I cover health and science news for the region of Europe, Middle East and Africa -- from flu pandemics to the newest planetary discovery to the latest drug and research developments. I joined Reuters in 1993 and worked in London, Amsterdam and Frankfurt before moving to BBC television to work on European politics for Newsnight for 2 years. Since returning to Reuters, I have also worked as a parliamentary correspondent in Westminster and on the main news desk of the London bureau."
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