EMEA Health and Science Correspondent
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Jun 9, 2015

Woman gives birth after childhood ovarian tissue transplant

LONDON, June 10 (Reuters) – A Congolese-Belgian woman has
become the first in the world to give birth to a healthy child
after doctors restored her fertility by transplanting ovarian
tissue that was removed and frozen when she was a child.

The woman, who was diagnosed with sickle-cell anaemia when
she was five and emigrated to Belgium at age 11, needed a bone
marrow transplant to treat her sickle-cell condition — a
procedure that requires chemotherapy first.

Jun 8, 2015

Modern housing could cut risk of malaria by up to half – study

LONDON (Reuters) – Modernizing mud huts and other traditional housing could significantly cut the risk of malaria for people living in some of the highest risk areas of Africa, Asia and South America, according to new research.

Scientists who studied the impact of types of housing on peoples’ risk of infection with the mosquito-borne disease found that residents of modern homes were 47 percent less likely to be infected than people living in traditional houses.

Jun 5, 2015

Global health leaders ask G7 for post-Ebola rapid response unit

LONDON (Reuters) – Global health leaders will ask G7 leaders this weekend to back the creation of a specialist rapid response unit to tackle outbreaks of infectious killer diseases.

The move reflects how the World Health Organization in particular was caught unprepared last year by Ebola, which spread through three West African countries, has killed 11,000 people, and will not be stamped out before the end of this year.

Jun 3, 2015

Wondering how long you have? Simple score gives five-year death risk

LONDON (Reuters) – Health researchers have developed a scientifically rigorous death risk calculator that predicts a person’s risk of dying within five years and say they hope people will use it to improve their health.

Using a simple set of around a dozen questions about such things as the number of cars you own or whether you tend to be a slow or, better, a fast walker, the predictor can give a five-year death risk calculation for any Briton aged between 40 and 70 years old.

Jun 3, 2015

Transparency, teamwork key to beating deadly South Korea MERS outbreak

LONDON (Reuters) – South Korea risks a long battle with MERS unless it is transparent, works with international virus-hunters and avoids mistakes made by Saudi Arabia, where the killer disease took hold after emerging in 2012.

Virology and infectious disease specialists fought for almost two years to persuade secretive Saudi authorities to share scientific data that may have helped them halt the spread of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) there more swiftly.

May 20, 2015

Paracetamol/Tylenol in pregnancy may lower testosterone in boys

LONDON (Reuters) – Pregnant women who take the painkiller paracetamol regularly for long periods may put their unborn sons’ testosterone levels at risk, leading to possible reproductive problems later in life, researchers said on Wednesday.

In a study using mice with grafts of human tissue, the scientists found that a week’s paracetamol treatment led to a sharp fall in the production of testosterone, a hormone that is critical to men’s life-long health.

May 19, 2015

Bullied kids have higher risk of adult obesity and heart disease

LONDON (Reuters) – Victims of childhood bullying are more likely to be overweight or obese as adults and have a higher risk of developing heart disease, diabetes and other illnesses, according to a study by British psychiatrists.

Researchers found that just over a quarter of women who were occasionally or frequently bullied as children were obese at age 45, compared to 19 percent of those who had never been bullied.

May 19, 2015

Is nicotine all bad?

LONDON, May 19 (Reuters) – Since he ditched Marlboro Lights five years ago, Daniel’s fix is fruit-flavored nicotine gum that comes in neat, pop-out strips. He gets through 12 to 15 pieces a day and says he has “packets of the stuff” stashed all over. But he doesn’t see himself as a nicotine addict.

Like many people, Daniel believes nicotine gum is far less harmful for him than smoking. Doctors worldwide agree. By giving up cigarettes, they say, Daniel has removed at least 90 percent of the health risks of his habit.

May 19, 2015

Insight – Is nicotine all bad?

LONDON, (Reuters) – Since he ditched Marlboro Lights five years ago, Daniel’s fix is fruit-flavoured nicotine gum that comes in neat, pop-out strips. He gets through 12 to 15 pieces a day and says he has “packets of the stuff” stashed all over. But he doesn’t see himself as a nicotine addict.

Like many people, Daniel believes nicotine gum is far less harmful for him than smoking. Doctors worldwide agree. By giving up cigarettes, they say, Daniel has removed at least 90 percent of the health risks of his habit.

May 13, 2015

Review suggests $3.5 billion prizes for antibiotic drugmakers

LONDON, May 14 (Reuters) – Companies that develop new
antibiotics should be awarded prize money of up to $3.5 billion
for each new drug, instead of selling the medication at a
profit, a review backed by Britain’s government said on
Thursday.

The review, lead by former Goldman Sachs chief economist Jim
O’Neill, said the lump sum payments could add up to $16-$37
billion over 10 years, but should only be made when companies
have fully developed a successful bug-killing drug.

    • About Kate

      "I cover health and science news for the region of Europe, Middle East and Africa -- from flu pandemics to the newest planetary discovery to the latest drug and research developments. I joined Reuters in 1993 and worked in London, Amsterdam and Frankfurt before moving to BBC television to work on European politics for Newsnight for 2 years. Since returning to Reuters, I have also worked as a parliamentary correspondent in Westminster and on the main news desk of the London bureau."
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