Opinion Editor, New York
Katharine's Feed
Dec 9, 2010
via Newsmaker

Watch: Three questions for DSK

The three things Reuters Economics Editor William Schomberg wants to hear Dominique Strauss-Kahn answer on Thursday, December 16:

Dec 9, 2010
via Newsmaker

IMF 101

The International Monetary Fund was created at Bretton Woods in July of 1944, toward the end of WWII.  It is one of two Bretton Woods Institutions along with the World Bank. U.S. President Roosevelt asked 44 different governments to attend the Bretton Woods conference so that they could draw up a plan to make sure that there would never be another Great Depression.

The below video shows delegates arriving at the resort in the White Mountains of New Hampshire.

Dec 7, 2010
via Entrepreneurial

Summit Series: Capitalizing on ideas?

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Katharine Herrup is the Opinion Editor for Reuters.com. This is the last of a three-part series on Summit Series. Read Part I: “A new kind of currency” and Part II: “Entrepreneurs set sail”.

Every member of Summit Series sold their belongings or shipped them back home to their parents’ place so they could travel with just one suitcase and live in different cities every six weeks. The idea is to meet “interesting” people face-to-face who are doing something good.

Dec 4, 2010
via Entrepreneurial

Summit Series: Entrepreneurs set sail

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Katharine Herrup is the Opinion Editor for Reuters.com. This is the second of a three-part series on Summit Series. Read the first part here.

The first major Summit Series event happened in May of 2010. Just after starting the company two years ago, the team of seven young men between the ages of 24 and 26, were able to get President Bill Clinton, media mogul Ted Turner and co-founder of the Carlyle Group David Rubinstein to come and speak. They were a part of an impressive group of 750 attendees.

Dec 1, 2010
via Entrepreneurial

Summit Series: A new kind of currency

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Katharine Herrup is the Opinion Editor for Reuters.com. This is the first part of a three part series on Summit Series. Read part two: “Entrepreneurs set sail”.

Who doesn’t want to be an entrepreneur these days?

The end result sounds ideal: doing exactly what you want to do. Of course getting a business up and running is incredibly tough work that mostly ends in failure, but if yours is one of the rarer ones to succeed, then you have accomplished what every person dreams of — being your own boss.

Oct 26, 2010
via PopTech

Edit your life and win a green contest

Graham Hill’s latest design initiative, Life Edited, is a contest to renovate a 420 square-foot apartment in New York City in a way that will radically reduce your carbon footprint. With $70,000 in cash, prizes and a design contract, why not enter it?

Hill, who is the founder of TreeHugger.com, which is now a part of the Discovery network, is on a mission to help everybody get rid of all the unnecessary clutter in their lives. In New York City, this is particularly essential if you want to remain sane. A good way to start is by “ruthlessly editing,” as Hill says, your minimal personal space in a green way. Speaking from personal experience, it also clears some (much needed) space in your mind.

Oct 25, 2010
via PopTech

The education of John Legend

For someone who was home-schooled for a number of years, it’s interesting that singer and six-time Grammy award winner John Legend spends what spare time he has reforming America’s public schools. He is especially devoted to Deborah Kenny’s Harlem Village Academies, a group of three charter schools in Harlem, New York.

Like many celebrities these days, Legend wants to — and does — leverage his success for a worthwhile cause. His introduction to education reform came from retired Giants running back Tiki Barber, who is a Harlem Village Academy board member. Ever since Legend met Kenny and visited one her schools, he was hooked.

Oct 25, 2010
via PopTech

Empowering the poor to be breadwinners

Samasource, a non-profit that connects people living in poverty to work via the Internet provides a different kind of economic aid. The founder of the organization, Leila Janah, who is also 2010 PopTech social innovation fellow, says that instead of just giving money and help to the poor, Samasource empowers them to be producers so that they are not forced to simply be receivers and consumers.

“There’s a new paradigm that’s an alternative to aid,” Janah says. “Aid is not necessarily the best solution for poor people. We spend a hundred billion a year on stuff that we know very little about — there’s very little transparency in the foreign aid world — and it has a perverse effect on small economies.”

Oct 25, 2010
via PopTech

Making it right in New Orleans

PopTech speaker Tom Darden is the executive director of the Make It Right Foundation, the organization started by Brad Pitt to rebuild affordable, green homes in New Orleans’ lower ninth ward. Make It Right has already built 50 homes and are in the midst of construction for another 30. Their initial goal is to build a total of 150.

So far, Darden has helped raise $36 million for the foundation. In 2009, Darden was named Louisiana’s Young Entrepreneur of the Year by the Small Business Administration. After being in New Orleans for four years now and having worked with the foundation since 2007, Darden explains why his work is so essential and how these types of homes can transform a family’s quality of life:

Oct 23, 2010
via PopTech

The invisible gorilla in the room

How well do we pay attention, asks psychology professor at Union College and co-author of “The Invisible Gorilla” Christopher Chabris.

In answering that query, Chabris, who investigates the illusions of our mind, also finds out how well we think we pay attention, which, in an era of short attention spans, is critical to know and understand.