Sports Business Correspondent
Keith's Feed
May 2, 2014
May 1, 2014
Apr 30, 2014
Apr 29, 2014

Financial Fair Play struggles to live up to its name

LONDON (Reuters) – The credibility of European soccer’s Financial Fair Play (FFP) rules will be questioned after it emerged that Manchester City and Paris St Germain would not be banned from the Champions League for breaching them.

City and PSG have been offered settlements for breaking rules designed to limit clubs’ financial losses and those agreements could be rubber stamped as early as this week.

Apr 29, 2014

Soccer-Financial Fair Play struggles to live up to its name

LONDON, April 29 (Reuters) – The credibility of European soccer’s Financial Fair Play (FFP) rules will be questioned after it emerged that Manchester City and Paris St Germain would not be banned from the Champions League for breaching them.

City and PSG have been offered settlements for breaking rules designed to limit clubs’ financial losses and those agreements could be rubber stamped as early as this week.

Apr 29, 2014
Apr 29, 2014

Man City, PSG have chance to settle FFP breaches

LONDON (Reuters) – Big-spending Manchester City and Paris St-Germain have been given the chance to settle breaches of UEFA’s financial fair play (FFP) rules that will leave them free to play in next season’s Champions League.

UEFA’s club financial control board has offered settlement deals in recent weeks to teams deemed to have broken rules designed to rein in reckless spending and make soccer more stable economically.

Apr 29, 2014

Soccer-Man City, PSG have chance to settle FFP breaches

LONDON, April 29 (Reuters) – Big-spending Manchester City and Paris St-Germain have been given the chance to settle breaches of UEFA’s financial fair play (FFP) rules that will leave them free to play in next season’s Champions League.

UEFA’s club financial control board has offered settlement deals in recent weeks to teams deemed to have broken rules designed to rein in reckless spending and make soccer more stable economically.

Apr 25, 2014

William Hill blames UK tax rise for betting shop cull

LONDON, April 25 (Reuters) – Bookmaker William Hill Plc
will close more than 100 British betting shops this
year, blaming the decision on a tax increase on high-stakes
gambling machines that have become one of their main sources of
revenue.

The Conservative-led government angered the betting
industry by announcing an increase in tax to 25 percent from 20
percent on the machines in its budget in March, a move that will
cost bookmakers around 75 million pounds ($126 million) a year.

    • About Keith

      "Sports Business Correspondent, a new role at Reuters. I was previously UK Chief Correspondent and have also worked in Italy, Ireland and the Netherlands during more than 20 years with Reuters. I have also worked as an editor in a number of senior roles."
      Joined Reuters:
      September 1988
      Languages:
      English, French, Italian, German and Dutch
    • More from Keith

    • Contact Keith

    • Follow Keith