Kevin's Feed
Jan 24, 2011

Vampire Squid? Big Gov’t? US crisis report splits

WASHINGTON, Jan 24 (Reuters) – Three competing, politically
charged tales of the financial crisis will emerge this week
when a U.S. congressional panel finally concludes its 20-month
investigation.

The Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission has failed to
produce a consensus explanation of the 2007-2009 banking
debacle, as it was asked to do in May 2009.

Jan 24, 2011

Vampire Squid? Big Government? U.S. crisis reports murky

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Three competing, politically recognizable tales of the financial crisis will emerge this week when a U.S. congressional panel finally concludes its 20-month investigation.

The Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission has failed to produce a consensus explanation of the 2007-2009 banking debacle, as it was asked to do in May 2009.

Jan 24, 2011

Vampire Squid? Big Gov’t? US crisis reports murky

WASHINGTON, Jan 24 (Reuters) – Three competing, politically
recognizable tales of the financial crisis will emerge this
week when a U.S. congressional panel finally concludes its
20-month investigation.

The Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission has failed to
produce a consensus explanation of the 2007-2009 banking
debacle, as it was asked to do in May 2009.

Jan 18, 2011

Obama orders review of government regulations

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Barack Obama on Tuesday ordered a government-wide review of regulations, both old and new, in a broad push to curtail rules that retard job creation and economic growth.

In a move to improve his relations with the business community, Obama ordered government agencies to consider the costs of regulations, maximize public input in their development, ensure they are underpinned by science, and consider their impact on small businesses.

Jan 11, 2011

Analysis: Flawed report seen from financial crisis panel

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The final report of a U.S. congressional panel on the financial crisis — due to hit bookstores in days — won’t be the blockbuster some hoped for, but it may help point the way toward mortgage market reform.

By mapping out the latest positions of influential Democrats and Republicans on how to fix the housing finance system and the giants that dominate it — Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac — the report could add value.

Jan 11, 2011

Flawed report seen from US financial crisis panel

WASHINGTON, Jan 11 (Reuters) – The final report of a U.S.
congressional panel on the financial crisis — due to hit
bookstores in days — won’t be the blockbuster some hoped for,
but it may help point the way toward mortgage market reform.

By mapping out the latest positions of influential
Democrats and Republicans on how to fix the housing finance
system and the giants that dominate it — Fannie Mae (FNMA.OB: Quote, Profile, Research)
and Freddie Mac (FMCC.OB: Quote, Profile, Research) — the report could add value.

Jan 5, 2011

Fed paper backs Wall Street reform under GOP attack

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Federal Reserve economists endorsed on Wednesday one of the crown jewels of 2010′s Wall Street reform laws — orderly liquidation of troubled financial firms — which a top Republican has targeted for repeal.

The Cleveland Federal Reserve Bank researchers, in a report that could foreshadow congressional testimony, said the orderly liquidation provision of the Dodd-Frank laws “is an important step toward addressing the too-big-to-fail problem.”

Dec 20, 2010

Two senators promise 2011 deficit-cutting bill

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Two senators pledged on Monday to offer bipartisan legislation next year that reflected proposals to slash the federal budget deficit submitted this month by a presidential commission.

“Taking the commission’s report … we’ll be introducing that as legislation, a legislative vehicle, next year, recognizing in the process that a lot of that would be subject to change,” Democratic Senator Mark Warner said.

Dec 17, 2010

Analysis: Tax deal offers slim hopes on cutting U.S. deficit

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The $858 billion tax deal approved by Congress on Thursday is “all candy and no spinach,” but at least it shows that President Barack Obama and Republicans can cooperate on fiscal issues.

But their new detente will be tested early next year when the budget deficit looms larger on the political landscape. Analysts are skeptical this week’s pact can be leveraged into a broad deficit-cutting program, and fear the deficit issue could be kicked forward to the 2012 election.

Dec 17, 2010

Analysis: Tax deal offers slim hopes on cutting U.S. deficit

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The $858 billion tax deal approved by Congress on Thursday is “all candy and no spinach,” but at least it shows that President Barack Obama and Republicans can cooperate on fiscal issues.

But their new detente will be tested early next year when the budget deficit looms larger on the political landscape. Analysts are skeptical this week’s pact can be leveraged into a broad deficit-cutting program, and fear the deficit issue could be kicked forward to the 2012 election.