Trade Correspondent, Washington DC, USA
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Oct 9, 2015

IMF told that amid ‘new mediocre’ no room for mistakes by central banks

LIMA (Reuters) – Central banks have little room for error in a low-growth world in which over-leveraged and commodity-dependent emerging economies and a slowing China are major risks, top international financiers told the International Monetary Fund’s meeting.

Despite $7 trillion in quantitative easing from banks in industrial nations since the global financial crisis, the world is stuck in a “new mediocre” growth pattern, IMF chief Christine Lagarde said on Thursday.

Oct 8, 2015

IMF’s Lagarde sees tough policy trade-offs

LIMA (Reuters) – International Monetary Fund chief Christine Lagarde urged global policymakers on Thursday to support economic growth while also tackling financial risks stemming from the provision of easy money amid a “rapidly changing and uncertain world.”

Lagarde, presenting a Global Policy Agenda at the fund’s annual meeting in Peru, said a recovery in the United States was broadly on track and an approaching rise in U.S. interest rates would tighten global funding conditions.

Oct 6, 2015

Faint corporate praise for TPP as winners, losers sought

SYDNEY/WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Early industry reaction to a long-sought trade agreement reached between 12 Pacific Rim countries on Monday amounted to faint praise that it could have been worse and umbrage that the United States appeared to be the biggest winner.

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) aims to liberalize commerce across nations accounting for 40 percent of the world’s economy but still needs ratification by each country.

Oct 6, 2015

Obama makes pitch to win support for Pacific trade pact

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. President Barack Obama kicked off a sales pitch on Tuesday for a 12-nation Pacific Rim trade agreement that has sparked concern among some lawmakers and won a lukewarm initial response from business groups.

Although ultimate winners and losers from the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) are still unclear, some Republicans are worried about its impact on industries including dairy, tobacco and pharmaceuticals, highlighting the battle ahead to win votes.

Oct 6, 2015

In Pacific trade deal, Australia gets bigger U.S. sugar allocation

ATLANTA (Reuters) – Australia, the world’s third-largest exporter of raw sugar, will be allowed to export an additional 65,000 tonnes of sugar per year to the Unites States under the Trans-Pacific Partnership deal agreed on Monday, an Australian official said.

That’s on top of the 87,402 tonnes of sugar allotted to Australia under the tariff rate quota for the marketing year that started on Oct 1.

Oct 6, 2015

Australia would have liked more sugar in TPP but happy with deal

ATLANTA, Oct 5 (Reuters) – Australia wanted more access to
the U.S. market for sugar than it got under a new Pacific trade
deal, but it secured benefits for local industries ranging from
wine to financial services, Australian Trade Minister Andrew
Robb said on Monday.

The Trans-Pacific Partnership will give Australia an extra
U.S. quota of 65,000 tonnes of sugar a year and a share of
growth in the U.S. market that Robb said could take total
exports to 400,000 tonnes a year by the end of the decade.

Oct 6, 2015

Historic Pacific trade deal faces skeptics in Congress

ATLANTA (Reuters) – Twelve Pacific Rim countries on Monday reached the most ambitious trade pact in a generation, aiming to liberalize commerce in 40 percent of the world’s economy in a deal that faces skepticism from U.S. lawmakers.

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) pact struck in Atlanta after marathon talks could reshape industries, change the cost of products from cheese to cancer treatments and have repercussions for drug companies and automakers.

Oct 6, 2015

Historic Pacific trade deal faces sceptics in U.S. Congress

ATLANTA (Reuters) – Twelve Pacific Rim countries on Monday reached the most ambitious trade pact in a generation, aiming to liberalize commerce in 40 percent of the world’s economy in a deal that faces scepticism from U.S. lawmakers.

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) pact struck in Atlanta after marathon talks could reshape industries, change the cost of products from cheese to cancer treatments and have repercussions for drug companies and automakers.

Oct 5, 2015

Pacific trade deal adds to U.S. price quandary for biotech drugs

NEW YORK/ATLANTA (Reuters) – The Pacific trade deal agreed on Monday, which grants biotechnology drug producers less protection than offered by the United States, could put more downward pressures on the costly drugs’ pricing in the industry’s most lucrative market.

The United States and 11 trading partners, including Mexico, Japan, Canada and Australia, wrapped up five years of talks after securing a compromise on protection for biotech drugs that would help determine when less expensive versions known as biosimilars can enter the market.

Oct 5, 2015

Pacific trade negotiators reach landmark deal, fight over approval looms

ATLANTA (Reuters) – The United States and 11 other Pacific Rim countries have reached a deal on the most sweeping trade liberalisation pact in a generation but the accord on Monday faced initial scepticism in the U.S. Congress.

In a deal that could reshape industries and influence everything from the price of cheese to the cost of cancer treatments, the 12 countries will cut trade barriers and set common standards. Details of the pact were emerging in statements by officials after days of marathon negotiations in Atlanta.

    • About Krista

      "I write about trade from Washington DC, where I moved in August 2013. IN nine years with Reuters, I have written about the Latin American economy from Mexico City and European Central Bank from Frankfurt. In a previous life, I worked in Australia and covered the economy and national politics for local news agency AAP."
      Joined Reuters:
      2004
      Languages:
      English, German, Spanish, Portuguese
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