Senior Personal Finance Correspondent
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Mar 28, 2012

How to haggle for that college money

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Over the next week, most colleges will give high school seniors the good news — who got in where — and the bad news — how much it will cost.

Then it will be crunch time for a full month, as parents try to make the numbers work so their kids can give colleges their final answers by May 1.

Mar 28, 2012

Stern Advice: How to haggle for that college money

WASHINGTON, March 28 (Reuters) – Over the next week, most
colleges will give high school seniors the good news — who got
in where — and the bad news — how much it will cost.

Then it will be crunch time for a full month, as parents try
to make the numbers work so their kids can give colleges their
final answers by May 1.

Mar 26, 2012

Treasury renews savings bond push

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The Treasury will unveil a new savings bonds website on Tuesday in an attempt to win consumers over to traditional government-issued, small-denomination bonds, despite their low interest rates.

Currently, Series EE bonds are paying a fixed rate of 0.60 percent. I bonds — which have variable rates including an inflation component that tracks the Consumer Price Index — are currently paying 3.06 percent interest, but that rate changes every six months and will next be adjusted on May 1, 2012.

Mar 21, 2012

Stern Advice: New angles on reverse mortgages

WASHINGTON, March 21 (Reuters) – Reverse mortgages used to
be the last recourse of the little old lady: A way for her to
get money for household help and stay in her home until she
died.

But now, baby boomers are sniffing around these backwards
loans, looking for a way to pay off other debts and provide
bridge funding for the early years of retirement. In a reverse
mortgage, a lender pays money to a homeowner, but the homeowner
has no monthly payments. The loan, plus interest, is repaid when
the home is sold.

Mar 14, 2012

Stern Advice: Inflation that the CPI won’t show

WASHINGTON, March 14 (Reuters) – When the consumer
price index is released later this week, it’s likely to look
scary because of the run up in gasoline prices that hit at the
end of February.

Economists polled by Reuters expect the CPI to be up 0.4
percent in February, double the January rate, mainly on oil
price increases that were 11 percent in February. In both
January and February, the index would have gone up half as much
if food and energy prices were excluded.

Mar 13, 2012

Savings low, worry high among workers: report

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Workers are saving less, worrying more and may be unrealistic about their ability to work as long as they think necessary to afford retirement, according to a major national survey released on Tuesday.

The 2012 Retirement Confidence Survey, published by Employee Benefits Research Institute, found workers in January as gloomy as they have ever been about their retirement prospects. The survey, which measures workers’ and retirees’ views of the future rather than actual savings data, has been conducted annually for 22 years and is largely underwritten by financial services firms.

Mar 7, 2012

When advisers follow the crowd

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Three years after a market rout sent investors scurrying in every direction but Wall Street, some financial advisers are tentatively starting to put their clients back into stocks, according to recent reports.

“Gun-shy advisers tiptoe back into equities,” read one of these stories, here at Reuters (link.reuters.com/nag96s).

Mar 7, 2012

Stern Advice: When advisers follow the crowd

WASHINGTON, March 7 (Reuters) – Three years after a
market rout sent investors scurrying in every direction but Wall
Street, some financial advisers are tentatively starting to put
their clients back into stocks, according to recent reports.

“Gun-shy advisers tiptoe back into equities,” read one of
these stories, here at Reuters ().
The gist of it was that investors, who had been afraid to
invest in stocks since the market tanked in 2008, were coming
back now that shares were rising briskly. And their advisers
were accommodating them.

Mar 7, 2012

How low must retirement withdrawals go?

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – After a lifetime of diligently saving, retirees are faced with a new question: How much can they take out during retirement?

Retirement — or the “withdrawal phase of life” as actuaries and other numbers wonks refer to it — can present a psychological challenge. It’s often hard to spend money that took decades to save.

Mar 7, 2012

YOUR MONEY: How low must retirement withdrawals go?

WASHINGTON, March 7 (Reuters) – After a lifetime of
diligently saving, retirees are faced with a new question: How
much can they take out during retirement?

Retirement — or the “withdrawal phase of life” as actuaries
and other numbers wonks refer to it — can present a
psychological challenge. It’s often hard to spend money that
took decades to save.

    • About Linda

      "Linda Stern is an award-winning personal finance journalist who loves to write about how the big picture affects your pocketbook. A former contributing editor at Newsweek magazine and a long-time Reuters columnist, Stern covers everything from credit cards to retirement planning to investing. As a Washington-based correspondent, she sneaks in as much tax and economic policy as her editors will allow. She tweets at www.twitter.com/LindaStern. And when she expresses opinions, they are her own and not those of her employer."
      Joined Reuters:
      October 2010
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