When news emerged in May that Facebook had hired an executive search firm to look for a woman to add to its board of directors, I had hoped that with the appointment would come a great deal of diversity of thought and experience and an independent voice. Facebook has now announced that it has chosen its COO, Sheryl Sandberg, to join its board. Having Sandberg on the board is a good step, but does it address the larger shortcomings that are concerning Facebook users and investors?

Facebook has the same problems it had a month ago, and the company is still running counter to this year’s “Shareholder Spring” – a global movement toward transparency, engagement, and checks and balances on corporate boards. The newly public company lacks diversity of thought and international experience outside of the Silicon Valley bubble; and because Facebook is a controlled company, if the board takes issue with something, it doesn’t have the teeth to do much about it.

Sandberg may come on to the board with full voting rights, but her vote won’t count for much if a boardroom battle occurs, since Mark Zuckerberg holds more than 50 percent of the company’s voting shares.

As COO she may not be an independent board member, but one positive change from Sandberg’s appointment is that it brings another internal executive voice to the table. Sandberg is capable, speaks with authority and knowledge, knows Facebook inside and out, and has strong board experience. It will certainly be important that there is more than one executive voice in the boardroom.

Yet her appointment doesn’t address the wider issues that are still at play. If, as a user, you were unhappy with Facebook’s policies – be it privacy issues or inadequate information about changes to the site – or, as a stockholder, you were unhappy about a botched IPO and a lack of communication from Facebook during the weeks that followed, then Sandberg’s appointment to the board won’t make much of a difference to you.