Lunae's Feed
Sep 4, 2014
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At war for the trees

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Centro do Guilherme, Brazil

By Lunae Parracho

A small army of Ka’apor warriors marched into the depths of the Amazon forest in northeast Maranhao state, with me in tow. This was one day of a weeklong operation to protect and survey the Alto Turiacu Indian reserve, which has been invaded by illegal loggers for years.

Ka’apor leader Irakadju told me how they had sought help from the Brazilian Army when they were in the region last year, but they had left, unwilling to ruin their jeeps and possibly afraid of the loggers.

Apr 3, 2014
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Struggles to survive in the Amazon

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Me Txanava, Brazil

By Lunae Parracho

A day of navigating along the muddy Envira River brought us to a village of the Huni Kui tribe known as Me Txanava, or village of the Singing Birds.

The moon shone bright in the starry sky over the silent village that lies in the municipality of Feijó – part of Brazil’s Acre state, which borders Peru.

Feb 17, 2014
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Manhunt for wildcat gold miners

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Jacareacanga, Para (Brazil)

By Lunaé Parracho

“We’re asking you not to go,” one of the Munduruku Indians said to me while standing in a circle of ten other warriors.

They feared that I would slow them down if I accompanied them on another six-hour hike through the forest to a wildcat gold mine operated by intruders in their territory. This was to be the fifth mine dismantled by the Mundurukus, who live in Brazil’s Amazon rainforest in the western state of Para. This region is rich in natural resources and has been called the country’s new frontier of economic expansion.

Feb 17, 2014

Brazil land disputes spread as Indians take on wildcat miners

JACAREACANGA, Brazil, Feb 17 (Reuters) – As Brazil struggles
to solve land disputes between Indians and farmers on the
expanding frontier of its agricultural heartland, more tensions
over forest and mineral resources are brewing in the remote
Amazon.

The government of President Dilma Rousseff gave eviction
notices to hundreds of non-Indian families in the Awá-Guajá
reserve in Maranhão state in January and plans to relocate them
by April, with the help of the army if necessary, Indian affairs
agency Funai says.

Sep 9, 2013
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Losing the land war

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Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil

 By Lunae Parracho

Three-year-old Sandriely has a look of suffering. She was born in the roadside camp along the same highway where her brother was run over by a truck. Her grandmother Damiana Cavanha, one of the few women chiefs among the Guarani Indians, has lost, beside her grandson, five other family members: one aunt died of poisoning from pesticides used on the neighboring sugar cane plantation, and her husband and three of their children were hit and killed by passing vehicles.

Damiana, Sandriely, and 23 other Guarani Kaiowa Indians are living in a makeshift camp along the shoulder of highway BR-463 in Mato Grosso do Sul since 2009. They settled here after their last failed attempt to take back their ancestral land, called Tekohá Apika’y. (Tekohá is loosely translated as ancestral land, and Apika’y, the name of that specific plot, means “those who wait.”) That was four years ago when they were expelled from their land by gunmen who shot one of them.

May 2, 2013
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A world without smiles

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By Lunaé Parracho

The northeastern city of Salvador, Brazil’s third-largest, is a major tourist destination thanks to its beautiful beaches and popular festivals. Its Carnival is considered the world’s largest street party.

In spite of being idyllic in so many ways, this city suffers from an unprecedented explosion of violence in recent years, part of a national phenomenon with the migration of violence towards the north. While the murder rate has dropped more than 63% in the southeast in the past ten years, it has increased 86% in the northeast. That is according to the 2012 Map of Violence compiled by the Brazilian Center for Latin American Studies.

Jan 21, 2013
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A place that even the rain has abandoned

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Across the drought-stricken states of Brazil

By Lunae Parracho

As white dust follows your car along dirt roads that cut through a maze of dry arteries while the burning sun dries out your skin, you realize that the wilderness is all around you.

A meek, skinny cow stares intently at everyone passing by, as if some stranger might bring it water or food. Starving goats roam here and there, chewing on dry twigs and looking for something to drink.

    • About Lunae

      "Born in the southern Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul in 1983, Lunaé Parracho began working as a photojournalist with the Diário de Cuiabá daily at age 17. Three years later, he moved to Salvador, where he worked for six years for local agencies, corporate clients and celebrity magazines, then for the daily A Tarde, reporting the explosion of violence that drove that city to become one of the most violent in the country. As a freelance photographer since 2011 and a regular Reuters contributor since 2012, Lunae has been focusing on Brazilian social issues and under-reported stories. ..."
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