MacroScope

Yellen selection no surprise to Reuters poll readers

President Barack Obama nominating Janet Yellen to head up the U.S. Federal Reserve came as little surprise to market watchers who read Reuters polls.

The current vice chair of the central bank was the clear frontrunner in two polls of economists, conducted by Reuters in June and August, to succeed Ben Bernanke when his term expires early next year.

All bar four of 44 economists polled in June thought she would take over although that decisiveness had slipped by August, when eight respondents changed their minds.

Four swapped their allegience to Obama’s former economic advisor Larry Summers, putting him on eight votes out of 39 in the second poll.

Summers, her closest contender, then pulled out of the race in the face of fierce opposition within the president’s own Democratic Party that raised questions about his chances of congressional confirmation.

This little piggy went to market

Italy and Spain are both set to launch syndicated bond sales today, taking advantage of temporarily benign market conditions and maybe with a weather eye on the U.S. debt stalemate which could soon throw the world’s markets into turmoil with an Oct. 17 deadline fast approaching.

After Silvio Berlusconi’s failure to pull down the government, Italy’s political crisis is in abeyance for now and its bond yields have eased back. Spain has issued nearly all the debt it needs to this year already.

It’s not quite “crisis what crisis” but the news flow has been largely positive:
- Portugal (after its own self-inflicted  political crisis over the summer) has seen its borrowing costs fall to their lowest in more than a month after its EU/IMF lenders said it was meeting its bailout goals.
- Greece is predicting an end to six years of recession in 2014 and, just as importantly, a primary surplus.
- And the IMF yesterday predicted Italy, Spain, Portugal, Greece and Ireland (which will soon become the first euro zone member to exit its bailout programme) would all grow next year.

Time for Fed to rethink its forward guidance?

Federal Reserve officials have largely acknowledged by now that leading markets to believe the central bank would reduce its bond buying stimulus in September and then failing to do so was a communications blunder.

For Zach Pandl, a former Goldman economist now at Columbia Management, this means the Fed may have to reshape its guidance to financial markets – even if the exact contours of the changes remain unclear.

Last month’s surprise may have increased the odds that the committee will rework its forward guidance in some way (though this will depend importantly on the identity of the next Fed Chair).

Right time to pump up UK housing market?

The British government is poised to announce the extension of its “help to buy” scheme for potential home owners.

As of today, any buyer(s) of a property up to a value of 600,000 pounds ($960,000) who can put up a five percent deposit, will see the government guarantee to the lender a further 15 percent of the value so a bank or building society will only be lending on 80 percent of the property’s value. Until now, demands for cripplingly large deposits have shut many prospective buyers out of the market.

The big question is whether now – with property prices rising by around 3 percent nationally and by a heady 10 percent annually in London – is a sensible time to be doing this given Britain’s long history of housing bubbles.

Greek turning point?

Greece will unveil its draft 2014 budget plan which is expected to forecast an end to six years of recession.

The draft will include key forecasts on unemployment, public debt and the size of the primary surplus Athens will aim for to show it is turning the corner. The government has said any further fiscal belt-tightening will not bring cuts in wages and pensions and that savings will be generated from structural measures.

If even Greece has passed the worst then maybe the euro zone crisis really is on the wane. The FT reports that billionaire John Paulson and a number of other U.S. hedge funds are investing aggressively in Greece’s banking sector, expecting it to get off its knees – an interesting straw in the wind.

Fed doves strike back


Now that Washington’s circus-like government shutdown has put a damper on hopes for stronger U.S. economic growth going into next year, dovish Federal Reserve officials again appear to have the upper hand in the way of policy commentary.

Take Eric Rosengren, the Boston Fed President who had been unusually quiet as the tapering debate gathered steam. In a speech in Vermont on Thursday, he returned to a familiar theme – the central bank still has plenty of firepower and should not be afraid to use it.

Unfortunately, most of the risks to the outlook remain on the downside. Concerns over untimely fiscal austerity here and abroad, and the possibility of problems once again emerging in parts of Europe, could cause the Federal Reserve to miss on both elements of its dual mandate – employment and inflation – through 2016.

Markets demand a little less conversation, a little more action from Draghi

 

Mario Draghi is patient. More patient than his audience on this sunny autumn day in Paris, where the European Central Bank held its October meeting.

The ECB president, relaxed and at times joking with Vice-President Vitor Constancio and host Banque de France Governor Christian Noyer, sitting to his sides, mastered with ease journalists’ repeated questions about possible policy action.

With inflation hitting a 3-1/2-year low last month and a far cry from the ECB’s target of just below 2 percent, money market rates banks use to borrow from each other tightening and political uncertainty in the euro zone top economies, many had expected to hear some kind of indication for action.

Economic damage from the shutdown? Small to start, say forecasters

The U.S. government shutdown probably won’t hit the economy too hard, say economists. Some point to the fact the shutdown has come right at the start of the fourth quarter, meaning there’s time before the year’s out for the economy to recoup some of  lost output resulting from the downtime. But, the longer it goes on, the worse it will be.

And there is always that debt-ceiling tail risk – the worst-case scenario being that the U.S. Treasury will default on one or more of its obligations. A Reuters poll on Monday put that risk at less than 10 percent.

Here’s a selection of comments from economists on the impact of the shutdown:

Stay of execution?

No sign of movement on the U.S. government shutdown but in Italy, party talks have been running red hot, keeping Italian markets in thrall.

Yesterday, senior figures in Silvio Berlusconi’s PDL party urged their colleagues to defy the former premier and back Prime Minister Enrico Letta in a parliamentary confidence vote expected today. Most tellingly, the media mogul’s key ally, Interior Minister Angelino Alfano, called on the party to back Letta.

Now nothing is certain in Italian politics and sources close to Letta say he will not call a vote if the numbers aren’t there, and could resign instead. But given he has a firm grip on the lower house, if even some PDL members support him in the Senate he should win the vote.

The never-ending story

Italian bond yields reversed a big chunk of their losses and stocks followed suit yesterday on the back of our scoop that 20 of Silvio Berlusconi’s senators had told him they could form a breakaway group if he pushed Italy into political chaos.

Whether they would switch their support to Prime Minister Enrico Letta and give him a workable majority in the Senate (he has a firm grip on the lower house) remains to be seen. That could buy several months of relative stability without the threat of Berlusconi mucking things up at any moment.

But we’re not anywhere near that yet and even then, elections would be likely in the spring. Those same senators did not speak out at a PDL meeting on Monday where Berlusconi said the party must push for early elections.