MacroScope

Humdrum summit

A two-day EU summit kicks off in Brussels hamstrung by the lack of a German government.

Officials in Berlin say they want to reach a common position on a mechanism for restructuring or winding up failing banks by the end of the year but with an entire policy slate to be thrashed out and the centre-left SPD saying the aim is to form a new German administration with Angela Merkel’s CDU by Christmas, time is very tight.

On banking union, a senior German official said Berlin had no plans to present an alternative plan for how a resolution fund might work at the  summit and reiterated Berlin’s stance that national budget autonomy for winding up banks could not be outsourced.

Spelling out how it will test Europe’s big banks next year, the European Central Bank yesterday insisted a common resolution mechanism must be in place by the time it takes over supervisory powers.

France, Spain and Italy want a joint commitment by all 17 euro zone countries to stand by weak banks regardless of where they are. Germany, which fears it would end up picking up most of the bill, is worried about the euro zone’s rescue fund, the European Stability Mechanism, helping banks directly without making their home governments responsible for repaying the aid.

Stress, stress, stress

The European Central Bank will announce the methodology which will underpin the stress tests of about 130 big European banks next year.

It is caught between the devil and the deep blue sea. Come up with a clean bill of health as previous discredited stress tests did and they will have no credibility. So it is likely to come down on the side of rigour but if in so doing it unearths serious financial gaps, fears about the euro zone would be rekindled and there is as yet no agreement on providing a common backstop for the financial sector.

France, Spain and Italy want a joint commitment by all 17 euro zone countries to stand by weak banks regardless of where they are. Germany, which fears it would end up picking up most of the bill, is worried about the euro zone’s rescue fund, the European Stability Mechanism, helping banks directly without making their home governments responsible for repaying the aid.

Forever blowing bubbles?

UK finance minister George Osborne is speaking at a Reuters event today, Bank of England Deputy Governor Charlie Bean addresses a conference and we get September’s public finance figures. For Osborne, there are so many question to ask but Britain’s frothy housing market is certainly near the top of the list.

The government is extending its “help to buy” scheme at a time when house prices, in London at least, seem to be going through the roof (no pun intended). Property website Rightmove said on Monday that asking prices for homes in the capital jumped 10.2 percent in the last month alone.

The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors has suggested the Bank’s Financial Policy Committee should cap house price inflation at 5 percent a year. A Bank of England policymaker retorted that it wasn’t down to his colleagues to regulate prices.

Want a home in central London? Better get that fifth job…


The average home in London’s prime areas is on track for setting you back a cool million pounds, according to property website Rightmove, putting them out of reach of all but the richest buyers – many of them foreigners who don’t even live there.

With an average yearly London salary of around 34,000 pounds you would need five full-time jobs to satisfy even the more generous lenders who offer mortgages worth five times income.

And that is after scrabbling together a minimum 10 percent deposit demanded by many banks, which would be 93,700 pounds based on the latest average house price data from Rightmove. Then there’s stamp duty (property tax) as well as legal fees.

Slow motion coalition

Angela Merkel’s CDU and the centre-left SPD will begin formal coalition talks in Germany this week after a meeting of 230 senior SPD members gave the go-ahead on Sunday.

To win the vote, the SPD leadership pledged to secure 10 demands it called “non-negotiable”, including a minimum wage of 8.50 euros per hour, equal pay for men and women, greater investment in infrastructure and education, and a common strategy to boost euro zone growth.

That means thrashing out a policy slate with Merkel’s party is likely to take some time so the betting is an administration won’t be in place until late November at the earliest. SPD chairman Sigmar Gabriel said the aim was to have a functioning government by Christmas.

Congress “smashed the instrument panel” of U.S. economic data: Fed’s Fisher

Richard Fisher, president of the Dallas Federal Reserve and one of the U.S. central bank’s arch inflation hawks, took us by surprise this week – he told Reuters that, given all the uncertainty generated by the government shutdown, it would not be prudent for the Fed to reduce its bond-buying stimulus this month.

“It is just too tender a moment,” he said. That was on Tuesday, before a last-minute deal averted a debt default but set up additional uncertainty by pushing the statutory spending cap into February.

Fisher said he wishes the Fed had begun the so-called ‘tapering’ process in September as markets has expected. But while he did not rule out a pullback from the current $85 billion monthly pace of asset purchases in December, he did acknowledge the next couple months of data could be “noisy” as economists try to weed out temporary shutdown effects from the broader trend.

Can we have a German government please?

Angela Merkel’s CDU and the centre-left SPD have agreed to begin formal coalition talks conditional on securing support from a meeting of 200 senior SPD members scheduled for Sunday. The party is scarred by its experience of coalition in the last decade, when its support slumped, but it’s probably the lesser of two evils since a new vote would be quite likely to increase Merkel’s support. She only just missed out on a rare overall majority first time around.

Assuming Sunday’s vote gives assent, talks proper will start on Wednesday. Hold your horses though. An entire policy slate will have to be thrashed out so the betting is an administration won’t be in place until late November at the earliest. In the meantime, euro zone policy negotiations are pretty much on hold.

To prove that point, an EU leaders’ summit on Thursday and Friday is unlikely to break new ground although of course all the hot topics such as banking union will be discussed.

From 1999: Another UK housing bubble? No chance!

While debate rages on whether or not Britain is heading into a new housing bubble, here’s a Reuters poll from 1999 that asked the same question. The answer then was,  ”No, this time is different”, and it featured a lot of the same arguments we’re hearing today.

Here it is, posted in full:

POLL-UK property recovery not a 1980s bubble

By Penny MacRae

LONDON, Aug 18 (Reuters) – Is Britain seeing a rerun of the 1980s property boom?

As buyers scramble to beat rising house prices, it may seem to many as though the roaring 1980s have returned.

How many politicians does it take to change a government?

Talks between Angela Merkel’s CDU and the centre-left SPD will resume on forming a German grand coalition but any agreement is probably weeks away yet.

With the Greens having bowed out at least we now know it will be a joint administration of the big two parties or fresh elections. The former remains odds on.

The SPD is scarred by its experience of coalition in the last decade, when its support slumped, but it’s probably the lesser of two evils for the party since a new vote would be quite likely to increase Merkel’s support. She only just missed out on a rare overall majority first time around.

How to play down a housing boom like it’s 1999

Here’s some of the top reasons from a 1999 Reuters poll on why a housing bubble wouldn’t form, which are re-appearing 14 years later.

The Bank of England will stop a bubble forming

    2013: “If there’s another bubble, the Bank of England and the Government of course have means by which we can anticipate that and ensure that that doesn’t happen again.” – Danny Alexander, chief secretary to the UK Treasury.
    1999 Reuters poll: ”Economists and property specialists say the Bank of England won’t let another inflationary boom happen. The Bank has already said it will monitor house prices closely. ‘It’s unlikely to become inflationary unless the monetary policy stance becomes too loose and that’s highly unlikely,’ said economist Trevor Williams of Lloyds Bank TSB.”

 

House prices expressed in real terms are below their peak and affordability is better