Let’s face it: “Gerxit” doesn’t roll of the tongue nearly as smoothly as a “Grexit” did. While Europe continues to struggle economically, fears of a euro zone break-up have receded rapidly following bailouts of Greece and Cyprus linked to their troubled banking sectors.

Mounting anti-integration sentiment in some of region’s largest economies, raise concerns about whether the divisive monetary union will hold together in the long run. Indeed, the rise of an anti-Europe party in Germany begs the question of what would happen if one of the continent’s richer nations decided to abandon the 14-year old common currency. Never mind that, viewed broadly, the continent’s banking debacle has actual saved Germans money so far.

Billionaire financier George Soros, has argued that Germany should either accept a closer fiscal union with its peers, including so-called debt mutualization – the issuance of a common Eurobond – or give up on the euro. Hans-Werner Sinn, head of Germany’s influential Ifo Institute, strongly disagrees, blaming the crisis on southern Europe’s “loss of competitiveness.”

A recent study from the Bertelsman Foundation highlights just how costly a German exit would be, even for Germany itself.

Euro zone membership provides Germany with significant economic gains that more than compensate for any advantages from a return to the deutschmark, a new Bertelsmann Foundation-commissioned study calculates. The currency union’s benefits remain even if Germany were to retain the euro and take a significant haircut on its loans to four eurozone countries hit hard by financial or fiscal crisis.