Fed stimulus benefits still outweigh risks, Lockhart tells Reuters

February 20, 2013

The Federal Reserve is cognizant of the potential costs of its unconventional policies, but the economic benefits from asset purchases are still far greater than the potential costs, Atlanta Fed President Dennis Lockhart told Reuters in an interview from his offices.

The fallacy of Fed ‘profits’ (and ‘losses’)

February 20, 2013

Richard Fisher, the Dallas Fed’s colorfully hawkish president, enjoys touting the remittances that the central bank makes yearly to Treasury, earned, circularly enough, mostly on the returns of the Treasury bonds the Fed holds. Here’s Fisher in September 2010:

Show and tell: Fed’s balance sheet not as big as you thought

February 15, 2013

Size matters, and Federal Reserve’s balance sheet is not as big as shrill critics of QE3 would lead you to believe.

Market/economy disconnect?

By Mike Peacock
January 30, 2013

Italy comes to the market with a five- and 10-year bond auction today and, continuing the early year theme, yields are expected to fall with demand healthy. It could raise up to 6.5 billion euros. A sale of six-month paper on Tuesday was snapped up at a yield of just 0.73 percent. Not only is the bond market unfazed by next month’s Italian elections, which could yet produce a chaotic aftermath, neither is it bothered by the scandal enveloping the world’s oldest bank, Monte dei Paschi, which is deepening by the day.

The dangers of a bloated ECB balance sheet

April 20, 2012

Central balance sheets across the industrialized world have increased rapidly in response to the financial crisis, as recently noted on this blog. In Europe, the balance sheet of the ECB and the 17 national central banks that share the euro currency has grown to around 3 trillion euros after the ECB injected more than a trillion into the market in 3-year loans and loosened its collateral standards.

Greek crisis: not as tragic as subprime

February 12, 2010

Markets are all over the Greek debt crisis this week and this will surely continue next week, but a stand-back analysis shows that the situation is not catastrophic and not as contagious as the U.S. subprime crisis when it comes to the impact on global markets.