MacroScope

ECB can claim one early victory for forward guidance

The European Central Bank can claim at least one early victory for forward guidance: forecasters have been persuaded by its promise to keep key interest rates low or lower for a long time.

While ECB officials have struggled to talk down rising money market rates that point to an undesirable early tightening of monetary policy, they have had more luck influencing market economists in Reuters polls.

That’s significant because both euro zone central banks and the Bank of England use Reuters polls as a measure of interest rate expectations.

A comparison of the same 43 respondents who took part in two Reuters polls – one taken just before the ECB adopted forward guidance in July, and one before this month’s meeting – shows how the new policy has swayed economists. (see chart – click to enlarge)

The consensus that the main refinancing rate will stay on hold until at least 2015 has firmed since forward guidance.

Italian market test

Italy will auction three different bonds, aiming to raise 7.5 billion euros against a volatile domestic backdrop.

A sale of one-year bills on Wednesday saw yields rise, this after the Treasury asked parliament to raise the ceiling on this year’s net debt issuance to 98 billion euros from 80 billion, given the struggle to rein in public finances and a government commitment to pay outstanding bills to firms, which at least could give the economy a boost.

Parliamentarians have a bigger fish to fry in the form of Silvio Berlusconi. A cross-party Senate committee that must decide on whether to bar him from political life drew back from the brink on Tuesday but has caused growing tension between the coalition parties with some of Berlusconi’s allies threatening to pull the shaky government down.

UK unemployment — the monthly monetary policy guide

Of the week’s economic data, today’s UK unemployment stands out since the Bank of England has pegged any move up in interest rates to a fall in the unemployment rate from 7.8 percent to below 7.0. The rate is forecast to have held at 7.8 percent in July.

Bank of England Governor Mark Carney has struggled to convince markets of his contention that interest rates are unlikely to rise for three years because the jobless rate will fall only very slowly. Interest rate futures – short sterling – spiked higher after last week’s policy meeting which offered no change of direction and no statement.

There are some key imponderables:
1. To what extent UK firms have kept workers on but worked them less (its certainly true that the jobless rate rose less than expected during Britain’s recession), leaving plenty of scope to ramp up as growth returns without hiring large numbers of new staff.
2. The economy is still three percent smaller than it was in 2008 but no one is quite sure how much activity has been permanently lost during the financial crisis so the size of the output gap is uncertain and therefore so is the level of output at which price pressures start to build.
3. Most importantly, with the Federal Reserve poised to act, can a country like Britain possibly divorce itself from the world’s economic superpower as it sets the global terms of monetary policy?

For markets, non-farms eclipse G20

The G20 will wrap up with entrenched positions on Syria and a little more entente over the emerging market turmoil prompted by the Federal Reserve’s impending move to slow the pace of its dollar creation programme.

The BRICS are plugging away with their plan for a $100 billion currency reserve pool to help calm forex volatility but officials admitted this is still a work in progress and won’t be deployable soon.

So, as China and Russia told India – and Washington said more broadly – it’s still incumbent upon countries to put their own houses in order.
The unsurprising rule of thumb is that countries with profound domestic problems have been the ones hit hardest since Ben Bernanke first put up his tapering plan in May. So, while the Fed may have caused the ripples, the fact the rupee is drowning is more due to India’s gaping current account deficit and general economic malaise.

History suggests rocketing British growth won’t last long

Britain’s economy is steaming ahead – by one measure faster than any other large developed or emerging economy – but history suggests it will struggle to sustain the rapid growth indicated in business and confidence surveys.

Data this week showed British businesses were at the forefront of Europe’s nascent economic recovery, outpacing major euro zone peers that are still grappling for momentum.

British services companies enjoyed their fastest growth since December 2006 in August, according to purchasing managers’ surveys, while housing market activity is gaining, and consumer sentiment is at its highest in almost four years.

Italy housing tax showdown

 

Italy’s fraying coalition cabinet meets to discuss what to do with a property tax imposed by previous premier Mario Monti.

Silvio Berlusconi’s centre-right group wants to scrap it – though that would create a 4 billion euro annual financial gap to be filled elsewhere – while the centre-left PD of Prime Minister Enrico Letta wants to keep it for the rich, which would cost only 2 billion euros. The argument has already stalled decisions on more wide-ranging economic reforms. A percentage point rise in the main rate of value-added tax has already been pushed back to October from July and will need to be discussed again too.

The big question is whether the government is effectively paralysed until a vote next month on whether to bar Berlusconi from parliament following the upholding of his tax fraud conviction. Members of his centre-right PDL are threatening to bring down the government and trigger early elections if he is expelled. If he is not barred, swathes of Letta’s centre-left PD would react with horror.

Recalculating: Central bank roadmaps leave markets lost

Central banks in Europe have followed in the Federal Reserve’s footsteps by adopting “forward guidance” in a break with traditionBut, as in the Fed’s case, the increased transparency seems to have only made investors more confused.

The latest instance came as something of an embarrassment for Mark Carney, the Bank of England’s new superstar chief from Canada and a former Goldman Sachs banker. The BoE shifted away from past practice saying it planned to keep interest rates at a record low until unemployment falls to 7 percent or below, which it said could take three years.

Yet the forward guidance announcement went down with a whimper. Indeed, investors brought forward expectations for when rates would rise – the opposite of what the central bank was hoping for – although the move faded later in the day.

Forward!

The Bank of England will give the government its blueprint for “forward guidance” when it publishes its quarterly inflation report, a big moment in British policymaking.

Canadian Mark Carney, in his second month at the helm, was heralded in advance as the man to kick start a languishing economy but with green shoots sprouting all over the place that may not be needed. Nonetheless, if companies and households can be convinced interest rates will stay at record lows for a prolonged period, that could boost investment and spending and help solidify a recovery that now looks to be in train.

After the U.S. Federal Reserve indicated that it may soon start to phase out its bond purchases – two of its policymakers again pointed to September yesterday – the Bank of England made a first stab at forward guidance last month, saying a rise in UK market rates was misguided. Now it will be more precise.

Event risk

If you’re hankering after “event risk”, look no further. Europe can offer top central bank meetings, front line economic data, a debt auction and more political risk than you can shake a stick at today.

This could be almost a perfect storm of a day after the Federal Reserve said its bond-buying would continue unabated for now and gave no new firm steer as to when it might begin rowing back, although its choice of adjective to describe the pace of growth – modest rather than the previous moderate – could be a hint that it is in less hurry to taper.

Now, it’s the European Central Bank’s turn. Given its forecast for recovery in the second half of the year has some evidence behind it, an interest rate cut is unlikely. Instead, for the second month running, Mario Draghi may have to focus primarily on the backwash from the Fed.

Bank of England on the money with its 1982 vision of a “less cash” society

The Bank of England has a fairly dubious record of forecasting the UK economy, but 30 years ago it was right about one thing – how our use of cash would change.

A look through the Bank’s publications archive, uploaded to its website on Tuesday and going back to 1947, reveals all sorts of historical curios – not least its handling of Nazi gold in 1939

Another is a 1982 report on why demand for cash was growing far more slowly than expected, which at the time was hard to reconcile with a widespread belief that the black economy was on the rise.