MacroScope

UK rate consensus nearly rock-solid even as markets flip-flop over timing

BFor all of the flip-flopping in sterling markets in recent months over when the Bank of England will finally lift interest rates off their lowest floor in more than 300 years, the consensus view among forecasters has been remarkably stable.

Not only that, but surprise news that two of the nine members of the Monetary Policy Committee voted this month to hike Bank Rate by 25 basis points to 0.75 percent does not seem to have shaken the view that it will be early next year before rates go up.

The Reuters Poll consensus — which the BoE uses to brief the MPC on policy expectations and cites each month in the minutes — has concluded on each occasion since March that a UK rate hike is not going to happen until the first half of 2015. Before March, the view was that it was likely to take even longer.

Yet despite all the recent talk of a rate rise this year, it has never come close to being the consensus.

Many analysts have concluded that Mark Carney’s hawkish speech in June to the Mansion House where he warned that a rate rise come sooner than many currently think was simply an attempt to shake markets out of their complacency.

Bank of England sticks to its view and analysts, some defiantly, stick to theirs

Bank of England governor Mark Carney gestures during the bank's quarterly inflation report news conference at the Bank of England in LondonMark Carney has delivered what is probably the clearest message on the trajectory of interest rates from the Bank of England for a very long time.

There was no more  talk of “forward guidance”, but the guidance was pretty clear: no change to the view, on track for a first rate hike in a very gradual series, starting around a year from now. Nothing to see here.

There were a few grey areas, notably whether wage inflation will pick up significantly (it hasn’t yet) and if the elusive appearance of meaningful British productivity growth ever takes place (which will prevent the labour market from generating too much inflation).