MacroScope

Want a home in central London? Better get that fifth job…


The average home in London’s prime areas is on track for setting you back a cool million pounds, according to property website Rightmove, putting them out of reach of all but the richest buyers – many of them foreigners who don’t even live there.

With an average yearly London salary of around 34,000 pounds you would need five full-time jobs to satisfy even the more generous lenders who offer mortgages worth five times income.

And that is after scrabbling together a minimum 10 percent deposit demanded by many banks, which would be 93,700 pounds based on the latest average house price data from Rightmove. Then there’s stamp duty (property tax) as well as legal fees.

As recently as August, a majority of economists polled by Reuters said Britain would see another house price bubble over the next five years.

They also concluded that London prices would rise around 6 percent a year – now surely too modest for 2013 at least.

From 1999: Another UK housing bubble? No chance!

While debate rages on whether or not Britain is heading into a new housing bubble, here’s a Reuters poll from 1999 that asked the same question. The answer then was,  ”No, this time is different”, and it featured a lot of the same arguments we’re hearing today.

Here it is, posted in full:

POLL-UK property recovery not a 1980s bubble

By Penny MacRae

LONDON, Aug 18 (Reuters) – Is Britain seeing a rerun of the 1980s property boom?

As buyers scramble to beat rising house prices, it may seem to many as though the roaring 1980s have returned.

How to play down a housing boom like it’s 1999

Here’s some of the top reasons from a 1999 Reuters poll on why a housing bubble wouldn’t form, which are re-appearing 14 years later.

The Bank of England will stop a bubble forming

    2013: “If there’s another bubble, the Bank of England and the Government of course have means by which we can anticipate that and ensure that that doesn’t happen again.” – Danny Alexander, chief secretary to the UK Treasury.
    1999 Reuters poll: ”Economists and property specialists say the Bank of England won’t let another inflationary boom happen. The Bank has already said it will monitor house prices closely. ‘It’s unlikely to become inflationary unless the monetary policy stance becomes too loose and that’s highly unlikely,’ said economist Trevor Williams of Lloyds Bank TSB.”

 

House prices expressed in real terms are below their peak and affordability is better

A jobless guide to interest rates

The Bank of England’s decision to peg any move in interest rates to the downward progress of unemployment has invested the monthly figures, due today, with huge importance.

In a nutshell, markets don’t believe the jobless rate will take the best part of three years to fall from 7.7 percent to below 7.0, the point at which the Bank said it could consider raising rates from a record low 0.5 percent. For what it’s worth, the consensus forecast is for the rate to be unbudged at 7.7 in August.

There are some reasons to think the Bank might be right – an ageing population working longer, slack within companies (such as part-time working) which can be ramped back up again before any new hiring takes place – but if markets continue to price in a rate rise early than the Bank expects, then it has de facto policy tightening to deal with.

Right time to pump up UK housing market?

The British government is poised to announce the extension of its “help to buy” scheme for potential home owners.

As of today, any buyer(s) of a property up to a value of 600,000 pounds ($960,000) who can put up a five percent deposit, will see the government guarantee to the lender a further 15 percent of the value so a bank or building society will only be lending on 80 percent of the property’s value. Until now, demands for cripplingly large deposits have shut many prospective buyers out of the market.

The big question is whether now – with property prices rising by around 3 percent nationally and by a heady 10 percent annually in London – is a sensible time to be doing this given Britain’s long history of housing bubbles.

France on a budget

The French 2014 budget will be presented in full today with the government seeking to reassure voters with a plan that makes the bulk of savings through curbs in spending, having relied more heavily on tax increases so far.

The government has already said it expects 2014 growth to come in at a modest 0.9 percent, cutting its previous 1.2 percent prediction, and that after a 2013 which is likely to boast hardly any growth at all.

As a result, the budget deficit is expected to push up to a revised 3.6 percent of GDP from 2.9 next year. That puts Paris in line with IMF and European Commission forecasts but what Brussels thinks about the plan as a whole is another matter.

UK unemployment — the monthly monetary policy guide

Of the week’s economic data, today’s UK unemployment stands out since the Bank of England has pegged any move up in interest rates to a fall in the unemployment rate from 7.8 percent to below 7.0. The rate is forecast to have held at 7.8 percent in July.

Bank of England Governor Mark Carney has struggled to convince markets of his contention that interest rates are unlikely to rise for three years because the jobless rate will fall only very slowly. Interest rate futures – short sterling – spiked higher after last week’s policy meeting which offered no change of direction and no statement.

There are some key imponderables:
1. To what extent UK firms have kept workers on but worked them less (its certainly true that the jobless rate rose less than expected during Britain’s recession), leaving plenty of scope to ramp up as growth returns without hiring large numbers of new staff.
2. The economy is still three percent smaller than it was in 2008 but no one is quite sure how much activity has been permanently lost during the financial crisis so the size of the output gap is uncertain and therefore so is the level of output at which price pressures start to build.
3. Most importantly, with the Federal Reserve poised to act, can a country like Britain possibly divorce itself from the world’s economic superpower as it sets the global terms of monetary policy?

Norway shifts tack

Norway’s centre-right swept to power last night, ousting a centre-left government that couldn’t capitalize on a solidly performing economy which escaped the world financial crisis largely unscathed (uncanny echoes of Australia’s weekend election here). The popular feeling seems to have been that a decade of strong growth was wasted and is now slowing.

Erna Solberg, Norway’s second woman premier, will have to govern with the anti-immigration, anti-tax Progress party which could be problematic. But they seem at one on the need for lower taxes at least.

Solberg also wants to revamp the $750 billion oil fund, the world’s biggest sovereign wealth fund. Changes could include breaking it up and requiring it to start investing in Norway, forbidden until now.

Italy’s High Noon

Silvio Berlusconi’s political future – upon which both Italian and euro zone stability rest to varying degrees – is up for debate when a Senate committee meets on Monday to begin discussions that could end with formal procedures to expel him from the Senate. Talks could last for days.

Members of Berlusconi’s centre-right PDL have threatened to walk out of Prime Minister Enrico Letta’s coalition government if a final vote – due in the Senate in October or maybe November – bars him from political life, following the upholding of his conviction for tax fraud.

One of Berlusconi’s key allies says he has already prepared a video message that could announce a decision to bring down the coalition government.

History suggests rocketing British growth won’t last long

Britain’s economy is steaming ahead – by one measure faster than any other large developed or emerging economy – but history suggests it will struggle to sustain the rapid growth indicated in business and confidence surveys.

Data this week showed British businesses were at the forefront of Europe’s nascent economic recovery, outpacing major euro zone peers that are still grappling for momentum.

British services companies enjoyed their fastest growth since December 2006 in August, according to purchasing managers’ surveys, while housing market activity is gaining, and consumer sentiment is at its highest in almost four years.