MacroScope

Does less QE from the Fed necessarily mean a stronger dollar?

Based on the latest U.S. Treasury flows data, it may be time to ditch the textbook theory that says less monetary stimulus means a stronger currency – at least for now.

The problem may just be that the theory doesn’t fully account for the situation when your largest creditors – and they are very large – are trying to beat you to the market.

The Federal Reserve first hinted in May it would start reducing its bond purchase programme because the U.S. economy is recovering and so is the job market.

Predictably, that news sent Treasury yields higher, with the dollar in tow. And analysts began pencilling in more gains for the greenback when the central bank actually begins scaling back.

But that move also spooked China and Japan – the largest foreign holders of U.S. debt.

Greek debt – remember the goats

Greece’s creditors have essentially let it off the hook by overwhelmingly agreeing to take a 74 percent loss.  So what better time to  remember  one of the first times Athens got in trouble with paying its debts.

In 490 BC, the bucolic plains before the town of Marathon were the site of a bloodbath. Invading Persians  lost a key battle against Greeks, who were led by the great Athenian warrior Kallimachos, aka Callimachus.

The trouble is, Kallimachos shares some of the difficulty with numbers that  modern Greek leaders appear to have.  Before launching himself upon the  Persians,  he  pledged to sacrifice a young goat to the Gods for every enemy that was killed.