MacroScope

Renzi’s moment

Italy’s president will meet centre-left leader Matteo Renzi today and is likely to ask him to form a government following the ousting of Enrico Letta as prime minister.

Renzi will need to reach an agreement with the small New Centre Right party to continue the current coalition and there is common ground. The 39-year-old has already said he backs lower taxes affecting employment, but they differ on issues such as immigration and laws allowing gay and lesbian civil partnerships.

A lot is at stake. Italy needs a strong government that can push through much-needed economic reforms but needs to pass a new electoral law first to allow for more durable administrations in future.

Renzi has struck a deal with centre-right leader Silvio Berlusconi which could ensure passage of a new law intended to favour large coalitions and ensure stable government over a full term.

The smart money had expected Renzi to wait in the wings, allowing Letta to do all the heavy lifting and then move to take over once an electoral law was in place. But it appears he lost patience with the slow pace of reform. Whether that is a smart move remains to be seen.

from Global News Journal:

Germany’s Finance Minister takes aim at the City

Has German Finance Minister Peer Steinbrueck finally said what many world leaders think but are afraid to say? That the British government won't sign up to meaningful reform of financial markets because it is too worried about what it would mean for the country’s most famous cash cow, the City of London.

 

The City, which accounts for around 35 percent of global foreign exchange turnover, has been a popular target for critics of capitalism for years. But it has rarely been singled out so bluntly as a problem by one of Britain’s close allies.

 

Even for a man not known for holding his tongue, Steinbrueck’s remark on Wednesday that Downing Street was impeding reform because it had “practically aligned” its interests with the City, was unusually undiplomatic. Just days before global leaders meet at a Group of Eight summit in Italy, Steinbrueck suggested the British government was plotting a “restoration” of the pre-crisis order to protect its own interests. The United States, by contrast, was now open to reform, he said.