India seeks to entice yield-seeking investors in a tapering world

By Saikat Chatterjee
July 25, 2013

 

India’s concerted effort to shore up the battered rupee over the past two weeks has had one goal in mind: raising currency-adjusted yields to a level where even investors wary of a withdrawal of cheap money from the U.S. would still buy emerging market assets. The central bank has raised overnight money market rates by more than 300 basis points – a spate of tightening not seen since early 2008 – and sharply inverted the swap and the bond yield curve in less than two weeks.

Self-inflicted ‘sudden stop’? Brazil blocked by its own currency war trench

February 25, 2013

In times of currency wars, it’s best not to shoot yourself in the foot. By imposing several capital controls in the past years, Brazil might have tightened monetary policy right when the economy started to falter, Nomura’s strategist Tony Volpon wrote in a research note on Friday.

Latin America: the risks of being too attractive

October 25, 2012

Ironically, an increase of capital inflows to Latin America in the last few years due to unappealing ultralow yields in industrialized countries and the region’s relative economic success is posing a threat for development, according to a recent paper that provides wider background to BRIC criticism of the latest U.S. Federal Reserve´s quantitative easing.

Foreign investors still buying American

April 17, 2012

Overseas investors have yet to sour towards U.S. assets despite high government debt levels, according the latest figures on capital flows.

from Jeremy Gaunt:

When things stagnate

October 25, 2011

Goldman Sachs researchers have been hitting the history books again, trying to divine what happens to currencies when economies stagnate. Answer:  Not as much as you might think

Some good econ reads from the Blogosphere

July 6, 2010

From the econ blogosphere:

UK BUDGET
— The libertarian Adam Smith Institute says here that the UK government should look at every government job, programme and department, and ask whether they are really needed. “Do we really need new school buildings….? Should taxpayers really stump up for free bus passes, or winter fuel and Chistmas bonuses for wealthy pensioners?”

Unlocking the Yuan

June 21, 2010

Reuters’s top news and innovation teams have put together a web site on the yuan and the debate over its revaluation. Particularly worth a look after the weekend’s statement by China that it would allow more flexibility in its currency exchange. You can access it here, but it looks like this:

Lessons for Europe from the U.S. single currency

May 20, 2010

The euro zone is not the only large currency union in the world.  There is also the United States. While it may be pushing things to see California as Germany and Mississippi as Greece, there is still a disparity in the potential of the economies of the U.S. States.

What can Kan do?

January 7, 2010

Mixed reaction from major European banks to appointment of Naoto Kan as new Japanese finance minister. ING is pretty scathing, saying the appointment sidesteps a process of change Japan must undertake to avoid further stagnation or a fate far worse.

from Global Investing:

The Big Five: themes for the week ahead

July 13, 2009

Five things to think about this week

TUSSLE FOR DIRECTION
- The tussle between bullish and bearish inclinations -- with bears gaining a bit of ground so far this month -- is being played out over both earnings and economic data. Alcoa got the U.S. earnings season off to a good start but a heavier results week lies ahead and could toss some banana skins into the market's path. Key financials, technology bellwethers (IBM, Google, Intel), as well as big names like GE, Nokia, Johnson and Johnson will offer more food for thought for those looking past the simple defensive versus cyclical split to choices between early cylicals, such as consumer discretionaries, and late cyclicals, such as industrials, based on the short-term earnings momentum. Macroeconomic data will need to confirm the picture painted by last week's unexpectedly German strong orders and production figures to give bulls the upper hand.