MacroScope

Tight consensus on China’s growth rate not reflecting real range of opinion

AChina’s economy, even to a non-specialist given a few minutes to stop and think, is clearly extremely difficult to measure.

When your population is 1.4 billion and you are in the midst of an unprecedented government and credit-fuelled expansion in infrastructure on your way to developed economy status, there are plenty of things that may get overlooked.

This is a completely normal set of circumstances in any developing and rapidly-changing economy no matter what methodology is used. Enough to fill tomes has been written on China’s data measurement challenges by commentators, policymakers and academics, not to mention the whole question of whether GDP is a useful way of measuring how any economy is faring.

What is truly striking is the lack of variance of opinion on where growth is headed in a country that has just gone through one of the biggest credit binges in history, with the credit to GDP ratio up by nearly two-thirds over the past five years, since the global financial crisis set in.

The latest GDP growth figure, for Q2, came in at 7.5 percent, just 0.1 percentage point above the consensus. That is the growth rate the Chinese government is aiming for this year. The range of opinion was very narrow, from 7.2 percent to 7.6 percent.

Better U.S. growth and just muddling along both point to low rates for longer

UFaith that the U.S. economy may finally be at a turning point for the better appears to be on the rise, as many ramp up expectations for a better Q2 and second half of the year.

But that does not mean that interest rates are likely to rise any sooner.

Goldman Sachs’s Jan Hatzius, one of the most dovish economists on when the Federal Reserve will eventually raise rates, has lifted his growth outlook but stuck to the view that the first interest rate rise off the near-zero floor won’t come for nearly two years, in early 2016.

The latest Reuters poll of Wall Street dealers on Friday still points to the second half of next year at least before the Fed, which is still printing tens of billions of dollars monthly as it winds down the third installment of its QE program, will start raising rates from 0-0.25 percent.

India share bulls running mainly on hope, well ahead of peers

A

Indian stocks have rallied sharply over the last two months, soaring to record highs, although the bull run that began with expectations that Narendra Modi will become the country’s next Prime Minister may soon run out of road.

India’s top equity index, the BSE Sensex, was trading over 24,850 on Tuesday, having shot up over 10 percent since mid-April alone, when polling began, despite economic growth languishing below 5 percent, along with high inflation and interest rates.

With growth at just 4.7 percent, only a marginal improvement from the 10 year low plumbed in the previous financial year, the market could struggle in coming months, especially if the economic data continue to disappoint.

U.S. growth back in bloom: most accurate Q1 GDP forecasters

PMost are convinced, including Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen, that the U.S. economy has already warmed up significantly from a growth deep freeze at the start of the year.

Business inventories were run down to nearly nothing in the first quarter, and were set for a rebound. There also is no sign that consumer spending is about to veer off its recovery path, especially with the job market gradually improving. All of that is likely to underpin better economic growth.

The question is by how much. Growth in the current quarter is forecast to be anywhere from 1.4 percent to 6 percent, according to a Reuters survey of 75 economists taken last week. That is the widest forecast range for U.S. economic growth in all Reuters polls in four years, except for one survey last April.

France flatlining

We get a flood of EU GDP reports today. Germany’s figure, just out, has marginally exceeded forecasts with quarterly growth of 0.8 percent but France is underperforming again and stagnated in the first three months of the year, missing estimates of 0.2 percent growth.

Robust German growth has been driven largely by domestic demand, which could help its European peers with their exports. Where all that leaves the overall euro zone figure, due later, remains to be seen. The bloc is predicted to have expanded by 0.4 percent.

Spain has already come in with 0.4 percent quarterly growth and others could pick up too so once again France is looking like one of the sicker men of Europe. High debtors Italy and Portugal are expected to eke out at least some growth.

Drop in German investor morale may have called the peak in growth

A BMW employee assembles a BMW motorcycle at the company's factory in BerlinEurope’s growth engine may be on the verge of gearing down, according to an indicator of German investor morale that recorded its biggest drop in one and a half years on Tuesday.

For a euro zone economy that is broadening, but still relying heavily on Germany for growth, as well as inflation that is dangerously low and well below target, that may add another line to the European Central Bank’s worry sheet.

The ZEW institute’s index of analyst and investor sentiment fell for the fifth month in a row to 33.1 in May from 43.2, coming in well below the most pessimistic forecast of 37.1 in a Reuters poll.

Most accurate U.S. growth forecasters say to brace for stronger data this week

Arrows shot by Olympic hopeful and member of the U.S. archery team Gibilaro are seen in the target in BranfordThe two forecasting teams that came closest to predicting the U.S. economy would nearly stall in the first quarter expect other key economic data due this week to be strong.

This gives some support to the view — which some say is more hope than a forecast — that a snap-back is already taking place as the Federal Reserve and most other analysts expect.

UBS and First Trust Advisors both forecast the world’s largest economy grew by a meager 0.5 percent on an annualized basis during the first three months of the year.

Britain’s economic sprint probably tripled U.S. growth in Q1

What a difference a year makes.

This time last year, analysts and investors were nearly unanimous in their expectation for a whole lot of nothing from Britain’s economy which, after a valiant leap higher from a spectacularly successful 2012 Olympic Games hosted in London, was back to just bumping along.

Now the UK is looking to clock the best sprint in the G7 for the first three months of a year – and by a wide margin.

The Reuters poll found a consensus for 0.9 percent growth in the UK in the first three months of the year on the quarter before. That would be the best in nearly four years, and just slightly below the Bank of England’s newly upbeat prediction. The data are due on Tuesday.

Fundraising for Kiev

If the hastily drawn up timetable is adhered to an interim Ukrainian government will be formed today. Whatever the line-up, it is likely to repeat its urgent call for aid.

The West, led by the EU, is trying to drum up support – Brussels has already talked with Japan, China, Canada, Turkey and the United States on possible help — but the signals are that big money will only flow after May 25 elections when a permanent government is in place. Can it wait that long? The IMF adds that conditions it imposed on a previous loan offer would still apply, strings that it would be tough for any government in Kiev to meet.

Russia’s next step is the great unknown question but it seems safe to presume that the $12 billion outstanding from its $15 billion bailout of Ukraine will not be forthcoming, at least for now. There is also the prospect of the cut-price charged for its gas zooming back up.

Oh là là, quelle surprise for the French economy

French economic growth unexpectedly picked up to 0.3 percent in the final three months of last year, welcome news and a rare positive shock for some particularly gloomy forecasters who were looking for shrinkage or no growth at all.

But the unexpected bounce may be partly for the wrong reason: government spending.

The Markit PMIs, which are generally accepted as a good gauge of the private sector economy, suggested economic deterioration throughout the quarter, leading Markit’s chief economist Chris Williamson to predict a 0.1 percent contraction.