MacroScope

And more from the ECB…

The bombardment of European Central Bank interventions continues today. ECB chief Mario Draghi addresses the European Banking Congress in Frankfurt and any number of his colleagues break cover elsewhere.

Draghi shepherded a surprise interest rate cut earlier this month and consistently says that other options are on the table though yesterday he said that talk of cutting the deposit rate into negative territory to try and force banks to lend more was people “creating their own dreams”.

Having said that, the prospect of printing money has been raised, at least in principle, and the markets still expect a new round of long-term liquidity pumped into the banking system – a repeat of last year’s LTROs – early next year. Anything more would be hugely difficult for Germany and its fellow travellers to swallow.

German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble talks at the same conference and staked out his ground yesterday, saying the ECB must not offer “false stimulus” and that monetary policy alone would not solve the euro zone crisis – a fairly clear warning off thoughts of QE.

Bundesbank boss Jens Weidmann was one of around a quarter of the ECB’s policymaking ranks to speak out against the November rate cut and has also constantly stressed the limits of monetary policy.

ECB quandary

Another round of European Central Bank speakers will command attention today with disappearing inflation fuelling talk of further extraordinary policy moves.

Chief economist Peter Praet, who last week raised the prospect of the ECB starting outright asset purchases (QE by another name) if things got too bad, is speaking at Euro Finance Week in Frankfurt along with Vitor Constancio and the Bundesbank’s Andreas Dombret, while Joerg Asmussen makes an appearance in Berlin.

We know a quarter of the ECB Governing Council didn’t want to cut interest rates (a move which Praet proposed) two weeks ago and more glaring differences could be about to emerge. Printing money would be hugely difficult for German policymakers and their allies to countenance.

Taking the union out of banking union?

Today’s meeting of EU finance ministers will grapple with banking union and next year’s stress tests though with no German government in place, a leap forward is unlikely.

One German official seemed pretty clear yesterday, saying: “We don’t want a mutualisation of bank risks.” That, some would argue, takes the union out of banking union and is certainly a very different approach to the one promised last year when EU leaders were scrambling to keep the euro zone together.

Some experts argue that with the European Central Bank pledging to support euro zone governments come what may, the urgency has been taken out of banking union and that next year’s health checks and cross-border supervision under the ECB is going far enough. Any holes in bank balance sheets can comfortably be filled by creditors and governments.

What is France to do?

It’s euro zone third quarter GDP day and Germany and France are already out of the traps with the latter’s economy contracting by 0.1 percent, snuffing out a 0.5 percent rebound in the second quarter. Growth of 0.1 percent was forecast, not just by bank economists but by the Bank of France too.

Germany failed to match its strong 0.7 percent growth in the second quarter, but expanding by 0.3 percent – in line with forecasts – it is clearly in much better shape.

The Bank of France has estimated stronger growth of 0.4 percent in the final three months of the year but the euro zone’s second largest economy is a growing cause for concern. An OECD report on French competitiveness, released overnight, said it is falling behind southern European countries that have bitten the reform bullet.

Brussels looks warily at German surplus

Barring a last minute change of heart, the European Commission will launch an investigation into whether Germany’s giant trade surplus is fuelling economic imbalances, a charge laid squarely by the U.S. Treasury but vehemently rejected by Berlin.

This complaint has long been levelled at Germany (and China) at a G20 level and now within the euro zone too. Italian Prime Minister Enrico Letta urged Berlin this week to do more to boost growth.

Stronger German demand for goods and services elsewhere in the euro zone would surely help recovery gain traction. The counter argument is that in the long-run, only by improving their own competitiveness can the likes of Spain, Italy and France hope to thrive in a globalised economy.

French travails

The Bank of France’s monthly report forecasts growth of 0.4 percent in the last three months of the year, up from an anaemic 0.1 percent in the third quarter. That still makes for a fairly doleful 2013 as a whole.

France is zooming up the euro zone’s worry list, largely because of its timid approach to labour and pension reforms. Spain has been much more aggressive and is seeing the benefits in terms of rising exports (and, admittedly, sky-high unemployment). So too has Portugal.

Tellingly, both the Iberian countries have had the outlook on their credit ratings raised to stable in recent days while S&P cut France’s rating to AA from AA+. It remains at a far stronger level but the differing directions of travel are clear.

United on banking union?

Reuters reported over the weekend that Angela Merkel’s Conservatives and the centre-left SPD had agreed that a body attached to European finance ministers, not the European Commission, to decide when to close failing banks.

At the risk of blowing trumpets this will make the euro zone weather in the week to come and could open the way for agreement on long, long-awaited banking union by the year-end.

Up to now, Berlin has chafed against the European Commission’s proposal that it should be in charge of winding up banks and the path to a body to act on a cross-border basis looked strewn with obstacles.

Moments difficiles

Breaking news is S&P’s downgrade of France’s credit rating to AA from AA+ putting it two notches below Germany. Finance Minister Pierre Moscovici has rushed out to declare French debt is among the safest and most liquid in the euro zone, which is true.

What is also pretty unarguable is S&P’s assessment that France’s economic reform programme is falling short and the high unemployment is weakening support for further measures. There’s also Francois Hollande’s dismal poll ratings to throw into the mix.

As a result, medium-term growth prospects are lacklustre. Euro zone GDP figures for the third quarter are out next week and France is expected to lag with growth of just 0.1 percent.

Take-off has been delayed

Euro zone services PMIs and German industry orders data will offer the latest snapshot of the currency bloc’s economy which the European Commission now forecasts will contract by 0.4 percent this year and grow just 1.1 percent in 2014 – hardly escape velocity, in fact barely taxiing along the runway.

We know from flash readings for the euro zone and Germany that service activity expanded but at a slower rate last month. France’s reading crept back into expansionary territory for the first time since early 2012. Any revisions to those figures will be marginal leaving the focus more on Italy and Spain for which we get no preliminary release.

Italy’s service sector has been growing of late, according to the PMIs, while Spain’s has still been shrinking though at a slower pace. German industry orders posted a surprise 0.3 percent drop in August and are forecast to have grown by 0.5 percent in September.

What’s happened to euro inflation?

New European Commission macro forecasts for the euro zone and the EU have been given added significance by an alarming drop in inflation to 0.7 percent which has heaped pressure on the European Central Bank to ward off any threat of deflation.

There are myriad other questions – Will the Commission predict that Italy will miss its deficit target? What will it say to those countries in bailout programmes – particularly Greece, where the troika returns for a bailout review today, and Portugal? And what about France’s sluggish economy? PMI surveys on Monday showed it is acting as a drag on the euro zone recovery.

Against that backdrop, European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso will speak at Frankfurt’s St. Paul’s Church, the seat of the first democratically elected parliament in Germany. He is expected to outline the political priorities of the European Union in the months to come and spell out his expectations of a new German government.