MacroScope

Another month, another downside surprise on euro zone inflation

sale signsNobody except a born pessimist ever expects a bad situation to get incrementally worse.

But the relentless downward trajectory of inflation in the euro zone has got plenty of economists sounding unconvinced that the situation will turn around any time soon.

A surprise plunge in Spanish inflation to -0.3 percent in July and a lack of any additional inflation pressure from Germany, the euro zone’s largest economy, dashed hopes that euro zone inflation would rise from 0.5 percent back toward the European Central Bank’s 2.0 percent target.

But the unexpected fall to 0.4 percent, the lowest since the dark days of the financial crisis in 2009, underscores how powerless the ECB is to address the situation in the short-term – and how dangerous it is to allow the current situation to continue.

When the Bundesbank, famous for its inflation-fighting credentials, calls for higher pay deals in Germany, you know there is a problem.

Euro zone inflation to fall further?

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Euro zone inflation is the big figure of the day. The consensus forecast is it for hold at a paltry 0.5 percent. Germany’s rate came in as predicted at 0.8 percent on Wednesday but Spain’s was well short at -0.3 percent. So there is clearly a risk that inflation for the currency bloc as a whole falls even further.

The Bundesbank has taken the unusual step of saying wage deals in Germany are too low and more hefty rises should be forthcoming, a sign of its concern about deflation. But the bar to printing money remains high and the European Central Bank certainly won’t act when it meets next week. It is still waiting to see what impact its June interest rate cuts and offer of more long-term cheap money to banks might have.

German retail sales, just out, have risen 1.3 percent on the month in June after a fall in May.

EU cuts off Russian banks, puts ball in Moscow’s court

Russia's President Vladimir Putin talks to reporters during a meeting in Brasilia

True to its word, the EU agreed sweeping sanctions on Russia yesterday, targeting trade in equipment for the defence and oil sectors and, most crucially, barring Russia’s state-run banks from accessing European capital markets. The measures will be imposed this week and will last for a year initially with three monthly reviews allowing them to be toughened if necessary.

There was no rowing back from the blueprint produced last week – having already agreed to exempt the gas sector – and the United States quickly followed suit, targeting Russian banks VTB, Bank of Moscow, and Russian Agriculture Bank, as well as United Shipbuilding Corp.

That is important. Both sides are striving to shut down alternative sources of capital for Russia’s financial sector although there has already been some reaching out to Asia. Gazprombank held a two-day roadshow with fixed-income investors in Seoul last week.

New EU takes shape

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The new EU aristocracy will be put in place this week with the European Parliament to confirm Jean-Claude Juncker as the next European Commission President today and then EU leaders gathering for a summit on Wednesday at which they will work out who gets the other top jobs in Brussels.

Although Juncker, who will make a statement to the parliament today which may shed some light on his policy priorities, is supposed to decide the 27 commissioner posts – one for each country – in reality this will be an almighty horse-trading operation.

Current best guesses – though they are just guesses – are that despite a willingness among some to play nice with the Brits, Prime Minister David Cameron may lose out again having voted against Juncker at a June summit. He is seeking one of the big economic portfolios; internal market, trade or competition.

U.S. hiring may be rebounding, but wage growth is not

AThe U.S. job market has finally turned a corner. What is remarkable is that it has taken so long.

Companies have finally begun taking on staff in consistently greater numbers, half a decade after the end of a deep recession brought on by one of the most punishing financial crises in history.

What companies haven’t been doing yet is offering consistently greater pay.

Deflating euro zone inflation expectations

EThe euro zone is not deflating, it’s just at risk of a too-prolonged period of low inflation, says European Central Bank President Mario Draghi.

Judging by recent evidence, it might be very prolonged, which is bad news for an economy struggling to shift out of low gear.

Inflation held steady at just 0.5 percent in June, well below the ECB’s 2.0 percent ceiling, stuck in what it calls the “danger zone” of below 1.0 percent for nine straight months.

Clock ticking

Amid all the furore over David Cameron’s failure to block Jean-Claude Juncker for the top EU job at a summit last week, the bloc’s leaders signed a free-trade pact with Ukraine and said they could impose more sanctions on Russia unless rebels de-escalate in the east of the country by Monday.

In turn, Ukraine president Poroshenko extended a ceasefire by government forces until 10 p.m. local time today.

The Russian economy would contract should the West introduce wide-ranging sectoral sanctions but that would not be a “dramatic” situation, Economy Minister Alexei Ulyukayev said over the weekend.

Weak UK inflation casts doubt on interest rate hike this year

 

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Bank of England Governor Mark Carney shocked markets last week, saying interest rates could rise sooner than expected.

At first glance, the latest UK inflation data suggest they might not.

Inflation has nearly halved to 1.5 percent in May from 2.9 percent last June. And wage inflation is much lower.

While still well above the euro zone, where inflation has tumbled to 0.5 percent, keeping alive the real risk of deflation, the latest UK inflation rate fell below even the lowest forecast in a Reuters poll.

Euro needs the Fed, or QE, for the next leg down

EIt has become increasingly clear it takes a lot more than words to sink the euro.

The European Central Bank cut rates as low as they will go on Thursday and announced another round of cheap cash for banks, hoping the euro, which has helped knock down inflation in the fragile euro zone economy, will fall.

Yet the ECB’s efforts yielded little more than a lukewarm response from markets, suggesting that the only thing that will get the euro to fall any further in the very near-term is a change in the outlook for U.S. rates, and through that, a stronger dollar.

India share bulls running mainly on hope, well ahead of peers

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Indian stocks have rallied sharply over the last two months, soaring to record highs, although the bull run that began with expectations that Narendra Modi will become the country’s next Prime Minister may soon run out of road.

India’s top equity index, the BSE Sensex, was trading over 24,850 on Tuesday, having shot up over 10 percent since mid-April alone, when polling began, despite economic growth languishing below 5 percent, along with high inflation and interest rates.

With growth at just 4.7 percent, only a marginal improvement from the 10 year low plumbed in the previous financial year, the market could struggle in coming months, especially if the economic data continue to disappoint.