Currency concerns everywhere

By Mike Peacock
March 24, 2015

A bureau de change operator counts U.S. currency notes in Abuja

Currency concerns in the central banking world have come to the fore again.

Sweden cut interest rates further into negative territory out of the blue last week, fearing its strong currency will engender deflation. The Swiss National Bank said it would aim to weaken what it sees as a “significantly overvalued” franc. And the Bank of England flagged the risk that sterling could strengthen further and leave inflation below target for longer.

Patient: Fed may drop the word, not the idea

March 18, 2015

RTR4R4RY.jpgFed Chair Janet Yellen may signal later today that she is no longer patient about when to consider raising rates but any eventual hike is likely to come after June, judging by how many key economic reports so far this year have undercut expectations.

Talking Turkey

By Mike Peacock
March 11, 2015

Turkey's President Tayyip Erdogan arrives for a welcoming ceremony at the Presidential Palace in Ankara

Turkish Central Bank Governor Erdem Basci will brief President Tayyip Erdogan today about sharp falls in the lira of about 12 percent versus the dollar this year which have not been helped by Erdogan’s criticism of monetary policy.

ECB to fill in the QE gaps

By Mike Peacock
March 5, 2015

ECB President Draghi arrives to take part in a plenary debate on the ECB's Annual Report 2013 at the EU Parliament in Brussels

The European Central Bank is holding its monthly meeting – an offsite gathering in Cyprus – and is about to commence its quantitative easing bond-buying programme.

Prescient Yellen saw limits of zero Fed interest rates back in 2009

March 4, 2015

yellen.jpgDespite the Federal Reserve’s trillions of dollars in newly printed money, workers’ wages and overall U.S. inflation have failed to take off since the recession. Longer-term borrowing costs, from 10-year Treasury yields to 30-year home mortgages, have also compressed without any real signs of reversing. While this has perplexed many economists, transcripts of the U.S. central bank’s crisis-fighting meetings in 2009 show that Janet Yellen, then the head of the San Francisco Fed, was prescient in warning colleagues of these very problems.

Turkish interest rate standoff

By Mike Peacock
March 3, 2015

Turkey's President Tayyip Erdogan gestures during a conference at the Foreign Affairs building  in Mexico City

Turkey’s central bank releases minutes of its last meeting at which it cut interest rates by a quarter point.

Negative inflation to herald QE launch

By Mike Peacock
March 2, 2015

US dollars and euros banknotes are seen in this illustration photo taken at a change bureau in Paris

The European Central Bank is about to start printing money. Euro zone data today will show why.

Restive Bundestag to approve Greek bailout extension

By Mike Peacock
February 27, 2015

German Chancellor Merkel, members of government and parliament observe a minute of silence during a session of the lower house of parliament Bundestag in Berlin

Germany’s parliament will vote today on the extension of Greece’s bailout by four months and will duly back it though we can expect some grumbling from a clutch of lawmakers.

Long night of talks in Brussels and Minsk

By Mike Peacock
February 12, 2015

Eurogroup President Dijsselbloem greets Greek Finance Minister Varoufakis during an extraordinary euro zone Finance Ministers meeting in Brussels

A long night of talks in Brussels and Minsk.

Despite going into the early hours of the morning, euro zone finance ministers failed to reach agreement on a way forward with their Greek counterpart and will try again on Monday.

Greece – a deal to be done?

By Mike Peacock
February 3, 2015

Greek PM Tsipras attends a memorial ceremony at the Imprisoned Graves in Nicosia

Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras will visit Rome for talks with Italy’s Matteo Renzi and will be met there by his finance minister, Yanis Varoufakis, who has already been to London and Paris to try the scope for a new debt deal for Greece and reassure investors that there won’t be a default.