MacroScope

Euro zone inflation to fall further?

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Euro zone inflation is the big figure of the day. The consensus forecast is it for hold at a paltry 0.5 percent. Germany’s rate came in as predicted at 0.8 percent on Wednesday but Spain’s was well short at -0.3 percent. So there is clearly a risk that inflation for the currency bloc as a whole falls even further.

The Bundesbank has taken the unusual step of saying wage deals in Germany are too low and more hefty rises should be forthcoming, a sign of its concern about deflation. But the bar to printing money remains high and the European Central Bank certainly won’t act when it meets next week. It is still waiting to see what impact its June interest rate cuts and offer of more long-term cheap money to banks might have.

German retail sales, just out, have risen 1.3 percent on the month in June after a fall in May.

One problem for the ECB will be how to remain in ultra-stimulative mode once U.S. interest rates start to rise. The Federal Reserve is on course to end its QE programme in October and repeated its message yesterday that is in no hurry to raise interest rates.
No tightening is expected before mid-2015 but as the realization grows that it is coming, it could start to have an impact. Strong U.S. GDP data yesterday and the Fed’s upgrading of its assessment of the U.S. economy pointed in that direction. There is little chance of euro zone long-term interest rates decoupling from U.S. ones if they start rising.

UK consumer confidence fell for the first time in six months in July, according to an overnight survey from GfK. The Nationwide building society said UK house prices rose at their slowest pace in 15 months in July and Bank of England policymaker Ben Broadbent said the edge was coming off the housing market. But he said he saw a case for an earlier rate rise though any tightening cycle would be “limited and gradual”.

The thin line between love and hate

The opinion on Turkey’s unorthodox monetary policy mix is turning as rapidly as global growth forecasts are being revised down.

Earlier this month, its central bank was the object of much finger-wagging after it defied market fears over an overheating economy by cutting its policy rate. It defended the move, arguing that weaker global demand posed a greater risk than inflationary pressures.

Investors were not persuaded. When I told one analyst about the Turkish rate move, he practically sputtered down the phone: “You’re not kidding?!”