MacroScope

Too close to call

Cakes are seen at a tea-party organised by members of the group 'English Scots for YES' near Berwick-upon-Tweed on the border between England and Scotland

A second opinion poll in three days has put the Scottish independence vote as too close to call.

TNS gave the “No” vote 39 percent  support and “Yes” 38. Its last poll in late July gave the “No” campaign a 13-point lead. Taking only those who are certain to vote, the two camps are tied at 41 percent.

The figures look different to YouGov’s weekend poll which sent a jolt through London and Scotland. It gave the secessionists a 51-49 lead but the direction of travel is clear and with only nine days to that could be decisive.

The counter argument is that voters now have a week and more to ponder the fact that their vote could be the one that counts. It’s easier to vote for dramatic change when it’s unlikely to happen.

Both the latest polls show that if the union holds together it will be old people that will have delivered. Women and Labour supporters, previous “no” strongholds, are deserting fast. The other question is whether there will be a “shy No” vote.

Fed and BoE to markets: pay attention to pay

A bookie holds a wad of cash on the third day of the Cheltenham Festival horse racing meetingIt is more than a bit ironic that those paid the most to pay attention to incoming data aren’t paying enough attention to pay.

Both Bank of England Governor Mark Carney and Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen have dropped many hints in speeches and public policy statements over the past several months that wage inflation likely will play an important role in any decision to raise interest rates.

Carney also made clear in parliamentary testimony on Tuesday that his interest rate rise warning last month that took so many off guard was a deliberate attempt to inject some volatility back into a very sleepy and complacent interest rate futures market.

Key to UK interest rate hike, pay data, still a muddle

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Bank of England rate setters meeting this week should be in cordial agreement that Britain’s economy is growing at a decent pace, and that price pressures look mostly in check at the moment.

But when it comes to gauging how quickly slack in the labour market is disappearing – a key question deciding when they should raise interest rates – the surveys look a lot less joined-up.

Two reports on Tuesday were far apart on the issue and underscore just how tough it is to get a grip on one a threat in any economy to future inflation – the pass-through effects from higher wage deals, which tend to feed upon each other.

Weak UK inflation casts doubt on interest rate hike this year

 

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Bank of England Governor Mark Carney shocked markets last week, saying interest rates could rise sooner than expected.

At first glance, the latest UK inflation data suggest they might not.

Inflation has nearly halved to 1.5 percent in May from 2.9 percent last June. And wage inflation is much lower.

While still well above the euro zone, where inflation has tumbled to 0.5 percent, keeping alive the real risk of deflation, the latest UK inflation rate fell below even the lowest forecast in a Reuters poll.