MacroScope

France on a budget

The French 2014 budget will be presented in full today with the government seeking to reassure voters with a plan that makes the bulk of savings through curbs in spending, having relied more heavily on tax increases so far.

The government has already said it expects 2014 growth to come in at a modest 0.9 percent, cutting its previous 1.2 percent prediction, and that after a 2013 which is likely to boast hardly any growth at all.

As a result, the budget deficit is expected to push up to a revised 3.6 percent of GDP from 2.9 next year. That puts Paris in line with IMF and European Commission forecasts but what Brussels thinks about the plan as a whole is another matter.

About 18 billion euros of savings for 2014 will be detailed with the bulk – about 15 billion – coming from spending cuts. Economists are already saying the new target to bring the deficit below 3 percent in 2015 could be difficult considering France’s decades-old struggles with cutting public spending.

Furthermore, EU officials are quietly expressing disappointment at the modest nature of French pension reforms, and it now seems the reforms will put a further burden on the public purse in the long run. The aim was to wipe out a pension deficit expected to reach 20.7 billion euros by 2020 if nothing is done, but government documents sent to lawmakers indicate the deficit for public-sector workers’ pensions would fall by only 800 million euros under Francois Hollande’s plan.

Norway shifts tack

Norway’s centre-right swept to power last night, ousting a centre-left government that couldn’t capitalize on a solidly performing economy which escaped the world financial crisis largely unscathed (uncanny echoes of Australia’s weekend election here). The popular feeling seems to have been that a decade of strong growth was wasted and is now slowing.

Erna Solberg, Norway’s second woman premier, will have to govern with the anti-immigration, anti-tax Progress party which could be problematic. But they seem at one on the need for lower taxes at least.

Solberg also wants to revamp the $750 billion oil fund, the world’s biggest sovereign wealth fund. Changes could include breaking it up and requiring it to start investing in Norway, forbidden until now.

Reform hue and cry

Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy meets labour union and business leaders to discuss reforms to pensions and public institutions. After some fairly brutal cutting, Rajoy has grown more cautious. He is negotiating a new formula for calculating pension payoffs but is wary of going further for fear of sparking greater protest. And all the time, recession put the country’s debt targets further out of reach.

There’s still some pretty serious stuff on the table. Rajoy’s cabinet has proposed a “stability factor” for the pension system, which would periodically adjust pay-outs and retirement age based on economic performance, demographics and other factors. The government is also studying a major reform to public administrations that could mean numerous job cuts in the public sector at a time when unemployment is at 27 percent.

The EU has granted France, Spain and others more time to meet their deficit targets in an attempt to foster some growth. But it is also insistent the pace of structural reforms must be stepped up. The French parliament voted through labour reforms on Tuesday which will make hiring and firing somewhat easier. President Francois Hollande will hold a rare news conference having travelled to Brussels yesterday to declare he would use the leeway to boost competitiveness and growth. Details? There were none. The European Commission will spell out its recommendations at the end of the month.

The pain in Spain … spreads to Italy

This morning, we exclusively report that Spanish Prime Minister Rajoy could be about to break another promise by freezing pensions and bringing forward a planned rise in the retirement age.

This latest austerity policy will be political poison at home but will give Madrid more credibility with its euro zone peers since that was one of Brussels’ policy recommendations for the country back in May. We know that at the end of next week the government will unveil its 2013 budget and further structural reforms which all smacks of an attempt to get its retaliation in first so that the euro zone and IMF won’t ask for any more cuts if and when Madrid makes its request for aid.

The pensions shift could well be kept under wraps until regional elections in late October are out of the way. It is less likely that the government can defer a request for help from the euro zone rescue fund, after which the ECB can pile into the secondary market, for that long given some daunting debt refinancing bills falling due at the end of next month.

from Global Investing:

Russia’s babushka time-bomb

The babushka, that embodiment of Russian grandmotherly goodness that has spawned iconic dolls and inspired a Kate Bush song, poses one of the gravest threat to the Russian economy.

Moscow-based investment bank Renaissance Capital also expects this segment of the demography to spur politically risky pension reforms.

Russia's pension system is coming under increasing strain thanks to growing life expectancy -- particularly among women -- and a shrinking labour force due to the collapse in birth rates in the 1990s.