Barack Obama’s message that any military support for Iraq’s besieged government is contingent on Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki taking steps to broaden his Shi’ite-dominated government may be having an impact.

Just hours after Maliki’s Shi’ite allies vowed to boycott any cooperation with the biggest Sunni party and his government had accused Sunni neighbour Saudi Arabia of backing “genocide”, Maliki broadcast a joint appeal for national unity alongside Sunni critics of his Shi’ite-led government.

They have tried and failed to come together before but Shi’ite, Sunni and Kurdish leaders met behind closed doors and then stood somewhat frostily before the cameras as Maliki’s predecessor read a statement denouncing “terrorist powers” and supporting Iraqi sovereignty.

Russian President Vladimir Putin and his Ukrainian counterpart, Petro Poroshenko, discussed a possible ceasefire in eastern Ukraine in an overnight telephone call after Kiev said it was treating an explosion on a pipeline carrying Russian gas to the rest of Europe as a possible “act of terrorism”, intended to discredit Ukraine as a reliable supplier.

In Moscow, the World Petroleum Congress takes place with execs from BP, Exxon, Statoil, OPEC and the IEA expected to attend. The focus will be on whether their message has changed since St Petersburg’s economic forum, where they promised Putin ‘business as usual’ amid sanctions, and also on whether the top people turn up.