from Shop Talk:

The U.S. recession ends, but not for you

October 29, 2009

unclesambegsTalk about a disconnect.

Experts say U.S. economic growth has returned, signaling the end of the longest and deepest recession since the Great Depression.

U.S. recession’s ending. Now what?

August 10, 2009

The latest Blue Chip survey of economists is out this morning, and there’s general agreement on one point: the longest recession since the Great Depression is about to end, if it hasn’t already. Some 87 percent of the economists surveyed thought the National Bureau of Economic Research will eventually declare the recession ended prior to the end of September.

UK goes crisis camping

August 5, 2009

If the Hollands Wood campsite in the New Forest, near England’s south coast is anything to go by, the recession really is altering the holidaymaking habits of the British public.

Flueconomics

July 24, 2009

Fears of the swine flu are rising and some doomsayers compare the pandemic with the Spanish flu outbreak in 1918, which infected a quarter or even half of the world’s population and claimed more than 40 million lives– or 2 percent of the then 2 billion global population.

UK heading for second downturn?

July 17, 2009

MacroScope is pleased to post the following from guest blogger Julian Chillingworth. Chillingworth is chief investment officer of UK investor Rathbones. He questions here whether Britain will face a second downturn shortly after struggling out of recession.

U.S. economic hole looking shallower

July 10, 2009

May’s U.S. trade figures have economists feeling quite a bit better about second-quarter GDP. The surprising strength in exports should provide a big lift.

Things for an economist to do on a Friday

July 10, 2009

Three things for the economy-minded to be doing on a Friday in July:

– Study a very, very clever interactive graphic from the New York Times showing that the business cycle is far from round. Here.

Crisis, what crisis, time again in Britain

July 7, 2009

Britain’s recession, like the downturns in most other places, is being hailed as either having reachえd bottom or tailed off in its decline. The latest to trumpet the beginning of the end is the British Chambers of Commerce, which said business orders and sales had continued to fall in the second quarter but at a slower pace than previously.

Saint Augustine and the U.S. consumer

June 30, 2009

Johns Hopkins University economist Christopher Carroll thinks U.S. consumers have finally got religion when it comes to saving, after years of free spending. For the sake of the broader economy, he is hoping they take to heart the prayer of Saint Augustine.

Mr. Green Shoots in an orange jumpsuit?

June 29, 2009

Economist James Hamilton was pretty offended by the rough treatment of Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke last week at the hands of some U.S. politicians. But when he put up a defense of the Fed chief on his blog, he got an earful from readers who were critical of the U.S. central bank and suspicious over its role in the financial crisis and last year’s bank bailouts.