MacroScope

Tight consensus on China’s growth rate not reflecting real range of opinion

AChina’s economy, even to a non-specialist given a few minutes to stop and think, is clearly extremely difficult to measure.

When your population is 1.4 billion and you are in the midst of an unprecedented government and credit-fuelled expansion in infrastructure on your way to developed economy status, there are plenty of things that may get overlooked.

This is a completely normal set of circumstances in any developing and rapidly-changing economy no matter what methodology is used. Enough to fill tomes has been written on China’s data measurement challenges by commentators, policymakers and academics, not to mention the whole question of whether GDP is a useful way of measuring how any economy is faring.

What is truly striking is the lack of variance of opinion on where growth is headed in a country that has just gone through one of the biggest credit binges in history, with the credit to GDP ratio up by nearly two-thirds over the past five years, since the global financial crisis set in.

The latest GDP growth figure, for Q2, came in at 7.5 percent, just 0.1 percentage point above the consensus. That is the growth rate the Chinese government is aiming for this year. The range of opinion was very narrow, from 7.2 percent to 7.6 percent.

Spain’s early bath a surprise to economists

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Much the same as economists often struggle to accurately predict data releases, their initial thoughts on how the soccer World Cup will pan out also appear to have been misguided.
While Brazil, the clear favourite to win in a Reuters poll of over 120 football-loving market analysts, is clinging on after a nil-nil draw with Mexico on Tuesday it’s a different story for Spain.

 

They were a firm favourite to appear in the final against the home nation but crashed out of the tournament in spectacular style on Wednesday after a shock 2-0 defeat by Chile.

“It was very disappointing last night,” said Tom Rogers at Oxford Economics, who had picked the Spaniards to lose in the closing match to Brazil.

Bank of England Minutes give rate debate another twist

 

carney.jpgSpeculation about when the Bank of England hikes interest rates took a new twist on Wednesday after minutes from the June policy meeting struck a less hawkish tone than the Governor did in a speech late last week.

Mark Carney caused a few shockwaves last week when he said rates could rise sooner than expected, sending sterling above $1.70 to a near five-year high

It also led to newspaper headlines like “Carney delivers strongest hint yet that interest rates could rise before the end of the year” and “UK interest rates to rise this year and could peak at 5 percent“.

UK rate rise this year? Possible, but not certain yet

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“It could happen sooner than markets currently expect.”

That was the bomb of a headline Bank of England Mark Carney dropped in a speech on Thursday that suggested a significant change in tone at the bank.

So far, Carney has seemed comfortable with keeping rates at a record low of 0.5 percent for another year. That has been the forward guidance markets have been following.

But are many now convinced that Bank Rate will go up earlier?

Not yet, but some.

Given that Carney’s remarks come only a month after he outlined a dovish outlook for rates in the May Inflation Report, he took many by surprise, sending sterling to just under $1.70 and rallying to less than 80 pence per euro.

Canada housing: This time it’s different, eh

AResults are in from the latest Reuters poll on Canada’s rampant property market from economists and market analysts, and the message is everything’s fine.

Prices will rise gradually over the next few years and there is very little risk of a crash.

But house prices in Canada have been rising in nearly a straight line for the better part of a generation, more than doubling, and taking household debt up with them.

Better U.S. growth and just muddling along both point to low rates for longer

UFaith that the U.S. economy may finally be at a turning point for the better appears to be on the rise, as many ramp up expectations for a better Q2 and second half of the year.

But that does not mean that interest rates are likely to rise any sooner.

Goldman Sachs’s Jan Hatzius, one of the most dovish economists on when the Federal Reserve will eventually raise rates, has lifted his growth outlook but stuck to the view that the first interest rate rise off the near-zero floor won’t come for nearly two years, in early 2016.

The latest Reuters poll of Wall Street dealers on Friday still points to the second half of next year at least before the Fed, which is still printing tens of billions of dollars monthly as it winds down the third installment of its QE program, will start raising rates from 0-0.25 percent.

Euro needs the Fed, or QE, for the next leg down

EIt has become increasingly clear it takes a lot more than words to sink the euro.

The European Central Bank cut rates as low as they will go on Thursday and announced another round of cheap cash for banks, hoping the euro, which has helped knock down inflation in the fragile euro zone economy, will fall.

Yet the ECB’s efforts yielded little more than a lukewarm response from markets, suggesting that the only thing that will get the euro to fall any further in the very near-term is a change in the outlook for U.S. rates, and through that, a stronger dollar.

U.S. May non-farm payrolls may be a calmer affair after April shock

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The May U.S. non-farm payroll report on Friday may be a much less volatile affair than last month, when shock news of 288,000 new jobs topped even the most optimistic views.

This time, there is more certainty around a less spectacular but still solid outcome, based on an analysis of forecasts from the most accurate economists in Reuters polls on recent U.S. data.

The range of views among economists who were closest to reality in forecasting recent key releases on jobs, manufacturing activity, and the magnitude of the contraction in first quarter U.S. GDP is significantly narrower than the range in the wider Reuters poll.

India share bulls running mainly on hope, well ahead of peers

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Indian stocks have rallied sharply over the last two months, soaring to record highs, although the bull run that began with expectations that Narendra Modi will become the country’s next Prime Minister may soon run out of road.

India’s top equity index, the BSE Sensex, was trading over 24,850 on Tuesday, having shot up over 10 percent since mid-April alone, when polling began, despite economic growth languishing below 5 percent, along with high inflation and interest rates.

With growth at just 4.7 percent, only a marginal improvement from the 10 year low plumbed in the previous financial year, the market could struggle in coming months, especially if the economic data continue to disappoint.

U.S. growth back in bloom: most accurate Q1 GDP forecasters

PMost are convinced, including Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen, that the U.S. economy has already warmed up significantly from a growth deep freeze at the start of the year.

Business inventories were run down to nearly nothing in the first quarter, and were set for a rebound. There also is no sign that consumer spending is about to veer off its recovery path, especially with the job market gradually improving. All of that is likely to underpin better economic growth.

The question is by how much. Growth in the current quarter is forecast to be anywhere from 1.4 percent to 6 percent, according to a Reuters survey of 75 economists taken last week. That is the widest forecast range for U.S. economic growth in all Reuters polls in four years, except for one survey last April.