MacroScope

A jobless guide to interest rates

The Bank of England’s decision to peg any move in interest rates to the downward progress of unemployment has invested the monthly figures, due today, with huge importance.

In a nutshell, markets don’t believe the jobless rate will take the best part of three years to fall from 7.7 percent to below 7.0, the point at which the Bank said it could consider raising rates from a record low 0.5 percent. For what it’s worth, the consensus forecast is for the rate to be unbudged at 7.7 in August.

There are some reasons to think the Bank might be right – an ageing population working longer, slack within companies (such as part-time working) which can be ramped back up again before any new hiring takes place – but if markets continue to price in a rate rise early than the Bank expects, then it has de facto policy tightening to deal with.

Funny thing confidence. No one could buy a jot of it for three years yet in a month offering the threat of a U.S. default – with Fitch having now put Washington’s credit rating on negative watch — and in which the Italian government almost collapsed, German investor sentiment shot up again.

Auto industry association ACEA is just out saying an extra working day and a surge in UK sales boosted Europe’s new car market in September, providing fresh evidence that demand is slowly bottoming out.

UK unemployment — the monthly monetary policy guide

Of the week’s economic data, today’s UK unemployment stands out since the Bank of England has pegged any move up in interest rates to a fall in the unemployment rate from 7.8 percent to below 7.0. The rate is forecast to have held at 7.8 percent in July.

Bank of England Governor Mark Carney has struggled to convince markets of his contention that interest rates are unlikely to rise for three years because the jobless rate will fall only very slowly. Interest rate futures – short sterling – spiked higher after last week’s policy meeting which offered no change of direction and no statement.

There are some key imponderables:
1. To what extent UK firms have kept workers on but worked them less (its certainly true that the jobless rate rose less than expected during Britain’s recession), leaving plenty of scope to ramp up as growth returns without hiring large numbers of new staff.
2. The economy is still three percent smaller than it was in 2008 but no one is quite sure how much activity has been permanently lost during the financial crisis so the size of the output gap is uncertain and therefore so is the level of output at which price pressures start to build.
3. Most importantly, with the Federal Reserve poised to act, can a country like Britain possibly divorce itself from the world’s economic superpower as it sets the global terms of monetary policy?

Say it with confidence: Consumer surveys as a leading indicator of jobs

It turns out people are better employment forecasters than economists. A report from New York Fed economists finds that confidence measures gleaned from consumer surveys are very tightly correlated with the path of U.S. employment.

The paper offers some illustrative charts that make a rather convincing case.

The chart below plots the Present Situation Index against the unemployment rate, whose scale is inverted so that high levels represent strong labor market conditions (low unemployment) and vice versa. One readily apparent feature is that the two series move together very closely throughout the period and, most notably, during all five of the recessions since 1977. It’s hard to tell from inspecting the chart, but the highest correlation (0.89) occurs at a two-month lead; that is, the Present Situation Index is even more strongly correlated with the unemployment rate two months into the future than it is with the concurrent rate.

The next chart looks at the relationship between changes in this index and payroll job growth – both over twelve-month intervals. This measure of employment is based on a different survey than the survey for the unemployment rate, but payroll employment is typically growing when unemployment is declining and vice versa. Once again, it’s very apparent that the two measures move closely together, and again formal analysis reveals that the Present Situation Index tends to foreshadow movements in employment by a couple of months. In particular, twelve-month changes in the index are most highly correlated with twelve-month job growth four months into the future – the correlation is 0.83.

An Italian bullet dodged, but more in the chamber

Italy will sell up to six billion euros of five- and 10-year bonds at a somewhat inauspicious time.

Yields rose modestly at shorter-term debt sales on Tuesday and Wednesday with the government wobbling, and the prospect of the Federal Reserve reducing U.S. stimulus has put pressure on peripheral euro zone bond yields more broadly.

However, Italy’s restive coalition managed last night to reach a deal on a deeply unpopular property tax, showing it can still function despite fractures over Silvio Berlusconi’s future. On the secondary market yesterday, yields dipped in anticipation of a deal which will abolish the tax from the beginning of 2014 to be replaced by a “service tax”.

Why the mediocre U.S. July jobs report was worse than it looked

U.S. economists were generally disappointed with the net gain of 162,000 jobs last month, well below forecasts around 180,000 and market talk of a possible reading above 200,000. The jobless rate did fall to 7.4 percent from 7.6 percent, but labor force participation also resumed its recent descent.

Thomas Lam, chief G3 economist at OSK-DMG/RHB, says the underlying details of the report make employment conditions actually look worse than at first glance. Here’s why:

The most striking aspect of the Jul employment report is that details of the release appear generally weaker than the uninspiring headlines figures.  The nonfarm payrolls print of 162k in Jul, while modestly softer than expectations, was accompanied by narrower gains in private payrolls (the weakest 1-month and 3-month diffusion data since Aug & Sep 2012), and net downward revisions of 26k in prior months (-19k in May and -7k in Jun, confined within private employment).  Moreover, the employment and workweek details from the Jul release imply that real GDP growth in early Q3 2013 might be tracking weaker than the advance Q2 2013 print of 1.7%.

Obama’s second chance to reshape the Fed

Lost in the bizarre Yellen vs. Summers tug-of-war into which the debate over the next Federal Reserve Chairman has devolved, is the notion that President Barack Obama is getting a second shot at revamping the U.S. central bank.

The perk of a two-term president, Obama will get to appoint another three, potentially four officials to the Fed’s influential seven-member board of governors in Washington. This may buy the president some political wiggle room when it comes to his pick for Fed chair, since he might be able to placate Republicans with one or two “concession” appointments. Every Fed governor gets a permanent voting seat on the policy-setting Federal Open Market Committee.

Elizabeth Duke, the last George W. Bush appointee, is already on her way out. So is Sarah Bloom Raskin, who after a relatively short stint at the board is moving to the Treasury, to be Jack Lew’s Deputy Secretary. Then there’s the awkward suspicion that, if Obama passes up Fed Vice Chair Janet Yellen, by far the favorite for the top spot, she will also step down after a long career in the Federal Reserve system, including many years as head of the San Francisco Fed.

U.S. job openings rise, but nobody’s hiring?

It’s a good news, bad news story: The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Job Openings and Labor Turnover (JOLTS) survey in June showed an increase in job openings, but a decline in new hires. The ratio of unemployed Americans to each open job fell in June to its lowest level in over four years.

The number of job separations (government code for layoffs) also fell, mainly due to fewer layoffs. The June numbers suggest some retracing of the gains of the previous month or two, but does not erase them, says Stone & McCarthy Research Associates economic analyst Terry Sheehan.

Job openings rose by 29,000 in June, but the number of new hires fell by 289,000. Simultaneously, the number of job separations also fell 300,000, mainly on declines in layoffs which fell 215,000.

A Marshall Plan for Greece

The spectacular failure of “expansionary austerity” policies has set Greece on a path worse than the Great Depression, according to a study from the Levy Economics Institute of Bard College.

Using their newly-constructed macroeconomic model for Greece, the Levy scholars recommend a recovery strategy similar to the Marshall Plan to increase public consumption and investment.

“A Marshall-type recovery plan directed at public consumption and investment is realistic and has worked in the past,” the authors of the report said.

Uncertain about the effects of uncertainty on jobs

Job number one at the Federal Reserve these days is to bring down high U.S. unemployment without sparking inflation. Job number two, it sometimes seems, is explaining just how unemployment got so high in the first place.

Two recent papers published by the San Francisco Fed offer what look like opposite takes on the topic.

“(S)tates in which businesses cited poor sales also registered disproportionately sharp drops in jobs and household spending,” wrote Princeton University professor Atif Mian and University of Chicago Booth School of Business professor Amir Sufi in a February Economic Letter.

Broken (record) jobless data: Euro zone unemployment stuck at all-time high

Surprise! Euro zone unemployment was stuck at record high of 12.2 percent in May, with the number of jobless quickly climbing towards 20 million. Still, as accustomed to grim job market headlines from Europe as the world has become, it is worth perusing through the Eurostat release for some of the nuances in the figures.

For one thing, as Matthew Phillips notes, Spain’s unemployment crisis is now officially more dire than Greece’s – and that’s saying something.

Also, the figures remind us just how disparate conditions are across different parts of the currency union. While Spanish and Greek unemployment is hovering just below 27 percent, the jobless rate in Austria, the region’s lowest, is 4.7 percent.