MacroScope

Drop in German investor morale may have called the peak in growth

A BMW employee assembles a BMW motorcycle at the company's factory in BerlinEurope’s growth engine may be on the verge of gearing down, according to an indicator of German investor morale that recorded its biggest drop in one and a half years on Tuesday.

For a euro zone economy that is broadening, but still relying heavily on Germany for growth, as well as inflation that is dangerously low and well below target, that may add another line to the European Central Bank’s worry sheet.

The ZEW institute’s index of analyst and investor sentiment fell for the fifth month in a row to 33.1 in May from 43.2, coming in well below the most pessimistic forecast of 37.1 in a Reuters poll.

The current conditions index, however, rose sharply to 62.1, higher than consensus for 60.5.

Thomas Harjes at Barclays says this is a bad signal:

Historically, the business cycle has often peaked shortly after the improving ZEW assessment of the current situation had overtaken declining investor expectations. For the Q1 GDP flash release on Thursday, we expect growth to have peaked at 0.7 percent quarter-on-quarter.

Putin welcomes Crimea in

Vladimir Putin has told Russia’s Duma that he has approved a draft treaty to bring Ukraine’s Crimea region into Russia and in doing so continues to turn a deaf ear to the West’s sanctions-backed plea to come to the negotiating table.

Overnight, Japan added its weight to the sanctions drive, suspending talks with Moscow on an investment pact and relaxation of visa requirements. EU and U.S. measures have targeted a relatively small number of Russians and Ukrainians but presumably there is scope to go considerably further, particularly if Putin decided to move into eastern Ukraine too.

EU foreign ministers yesterday began discussing how to reduce energy reliance on Russia. That’s a long-term project but one that could deal a hammer blow to the Russian economy if it succeeds.

A moment of truth for Turkey

Turkish Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan will make his first visit to Brussels for five years where he will meet EU Council President Herman Van Rompuy, European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso and European Parliament President Martin Schulz.

The EU has been critical of Erdogan’s response to a sweeping corruption inquiry, clearing out hundreds of police officers and raising concern about a roll-back of reforms meant to strengthen independence of judiciary.

That will put a new round of EU membership talks which began two months ago into a rather tricky light. They had already been delayed after Brussels took a dim view of the way Erdogan cracked down on anti-government demonstrators over the summer.

Banking union … timber not steel

A day after she was sworn in for a third term and a day before she attends an EU summit in Brussels, Chancellor Angela Merkel delivers a speech in the Bundestag lower house. She will then head to Paris in the evening for a meeting with French President Francois Hollande. That bilateral could be the moment that the seal is set on banking union, in time for the Thursday/Friday EU leaders summit.

In parallel, the bloc’s 28 finance ministers will meet in Brussels to try and finalise a common position on the detail. “For the acceptance of the euro on financial markets, the banking union is very important,” Merkel said on Tuesday.

For the markets, it will be impossible to look beyond today’s Federal Reserve policy decision which might, or might not, start the process of slowing the pace of money-printing which has been churning out $85 billion a month. But banking union is hugely important too.
Euro zone finance ministers made progress overnight, essentially agreeing the blueprint Reuters reported exclusively over the weekend.

Decision day for Kiev … and Moscow

Decision day for Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovich as he heads to the Kremlin seeking a financial lifeline while demonstrators in Kiev gather again to demand he steps down.

Vladimir Putin seems set to agree a loan deal, and possibly offer Ukraine a discount on the Russian natural gas.
It seemed he was the only game in town after an EU commissioner said the bloc was suspending talks on a trade agreement with Kiev. But yesterday, European Union foreign ministers said the door remained open, which in a way makes Yanukovich’s predicament harder.

Does Russia really need this? Politically yes, but economically? Ukraine is seeking help to cover an external funding gap of $17 billion next year and is in no position to pay for its gas.

Just a typical euro zone day

Spain will sell up to four billion euros of six- and 12-month treasury bills, prior to a full bond auction on Thursday. Italy attracted only anaemic demand at auction last week and Madrid has already had to pay more to borrow since the Federal Reserve shook up the markets with its blueprint for an exit from QE.

However, yields are nothing like back to the danger levels of last year and both countries have frontloaded their funding this year. Economy Minister Luis de Guindos, who declared over the weekend that the Spanish economy will grow in the second half of the year, speaks later in the day.

The political backdrop is also shaky, and getting shakier by the day, although that doesn’t always infect market sentiment. Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy rejected calls to resign on Monday over a party financing scandal and said his reform programme would continue unaffected.

Springing back to life

The steady stream of less-bad-than-expected economic data has evidently been working as a builder of optimism. Confidence in improved economies and financlal market conditions is growing.

One of the biggest surprises has been Germany’s ZEW economic sentiment survey — which polls analysts and economists in Europe’s largest economy. Not only did the index jump this month, it entered positive territory for the first time since July 2007. That was before the credit crisis hit.

U.S. financial services firm State Street also reports that the mood among institutional investors in North America, Europe and Asia is at a nine month high. The main point about this survey is that it is extraplolated from the actual buying and selling patterns within $12 trillion that State Street holds for investors as a custodian.