Reuters Special Correspondent
Matthew's Feed
Sep 24, 2013

The struggle Pakistan does not want reported

KARACHI, Pakistan (Reuters) – Abdul Razzaq Baloch worked nights. After dinner, he would start his shift as a proofreader at the Daily Tawar, a newspaper published on a shoe-string from a cramped office in Karachi, Pakistan’s commercial capital. At 2 a.m., the 42-year-old would make the short journey home on his new Super Star motorbike.

One night in March, Baloch did not return. His phone was switched off and his bike was missing. His family made enquiries with the police, then hospitals, and finally in the lanes of Lyari, the gritty neighbourhood where they live.

Sep 24, 2013

Special Report: The struggle Pakistan does not want reported

KARACHI, Pakistan (Reuters) – Abdul Razzaq Baloch worked nights. After dinner, he would start his shift as a proofreader at the Daily Tawar, a newspaper published on a shoe-string from a cramped office in Karachi, Pakistan’s commercial capital. At 2 a.m., the 42-year-old would make the short journey home on his new Super Star motorbike.

One night in March, Baloch did not return. His phone was switched off and his bike was missing. His family made enquiries with the police, then hospitals, and finally in the lanes of Lyari, the gritty neighborhood where they live.

Aug 1, 2013

Diamonds in the very rough, Pakistan lures contrarian private equity

KARACHI, Pakistan, Aug 2 (Reuters) – With its brisk kidnap
industry, dirty politics and robust murder rate, Pakistan’s
commercial capital Karachi is an unlikely destination for a pair
of go-getting financiers fired with the follow-the-money ethos
of Wall Street.

But the risk-hungry duo have forsaken budding careers in the
U.S. financial industry in the belief that somewhere in
Pakistan’s ranks of unglamorous, overlooked family businesses
lie hidden the seeds of future corporate giants.

Jul 2, 2013
Jun 28, 2013
Jun 28, 2013
Jun 27, 2013

Analysis: Clashing visions weigh on U.S. drive for Taliban talks

ISLAMABAD (Reuters) – As the United States makes a fresh attempt to start talks with the Taliban, competing visions in Afghanistan and neighboring Pakistan over what an eventual peace process might look like have emerged as one of the biggest hurdles.

Washington’s hopes of negotiating with the insurgents to stabilize Afghanistan before most foreign troops leave by the end of 2014 had appeared to achieve a breakthrough last week when the Taliban opened an office in the Qatari capital Doha.

Jun 27, 2013

Clashing visions weigh on U.S. drive for Taliban talks

ISLAMABAD, June 28 (Reuters) – As the United States makes a
fresh attempt to start talks with the Taliban, competing visions
in Afghanistan and neighbouring Pakistan over what an eventual
peace process might look like have emerged as one of the biggest
hurdles.

Washington’s hopes of negotiating with the insurgents to
stabilise Afghanistan before most foreign troops leave by the
end of 2014 had appeared to achieve a breakthrough last week
when the Taliban opened an office in the Qatari capital Doha.

Jun 23, 2013
Jun 23, 2013